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Dublin’s biggest film festival makes its return this March. Things will be different, but the biggest celebration of cinema in the fair city of film is scheduled to go ahead this Spring. The best of filmmaking from Ireland and around the world will be shared at VMDIFF 2021 in a new multi-platform programme to meet the challenges of our current times. The Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2021 will be a varied selection of films available in cinemas, outdoors and at home.

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Directed by: Matt Bettinelli-Olpin, Tyler Gillett Starring: Samara Weaving, Adam Brody, Mark O’Brien, Henry Czerny, Andie McDowell Runtime: 95 mins


Ready Or Not manages to balance fun with suspense, its fast pace keeps the viewer onboard throughout the simple but bonkers premise. The film opens with Grace, who is marrying into the Le Domas board game dynasty (or dominion as they prefer), practicing her vows ahead of a garden wedding in the grounds of the Le Domas’ estate. We soon meet her fiance Alex who in a bout of flirty banter suggests they ditch the wedding and run away together. Turns out this isn’t a bad idea.

While Grace and Alex are making out in his room, they’re interrupted by his elderly Aunt Helene who announces that it’s time they come and join the family for a game. Alex goes on to explain that this is a quirky family tradition; each married couple must take part in a game starting at midnight to initiate the new family member. Grace agrees to humour her new in-laws and joins the fam in a room hidden in the middle of the house by big antique doors which wouldn’t look out of place in Cluedo. Here, Alex’ father Tony goes on to explain that the Le Domas’ attribute their wealth and success to a deal to a wager his great-grandfather made during a sea voyage with Mr. Le Bail. The wager involved a mysterious box which Tony explains randomly selects the game to be played by the incoming family member. Grace draws Hide and Seek, the family play an old-timey Hide and Seek song on a gramophone and she goes off to hide. What she doesn’t know is that if they catch her, they’ll kill her.

Ready Or Not borrows from the story lines of cult horror, the aesthetics of adventure stories, mingles it together with fabulous acting from Samara Weaving and the fast pace carries us through what is quite a bare premise. The Le Domas house is stunning and the directors take the time to give us sweeping views of the chandeliers, gorgeous staircase and massive grounds in a way that’s reminiscent of Spanish horror. The characters are quite broadstrokes; all we know about Grace is she was a foster child and that she’s been with Alex for 18 months, we get a sense of her personality but we don’t really get a feel for the others. The film has a You’re Next vibe but it actually gives Grace more credit than Erin gets in You’re Next; Grace hasn’t been trained by her father to be a survivalist, her ability to adapt and react to this situation and come out on top is entirely down to her own competence. She knows when to hide and when to fight and it’s refreshing to see a woman in a horror film who isn’t just screaming and falling over.

At times it feels like the film is dipping its toe into social commentary territory, like when the maids get killed and the family barely react or when Grace exclaims ‘Fucking rich people’ when she’s running for her life but it’s all very surface-level stuff, particularly because the film is moving at breakneck speed through its plot. Still, we’re in a safe pair of hands with duo Matt Bettinelli-Olpin, Tyler Gillett who have collaborated previously on horror titles VHS, Southbound and Devil’s Due. They’re well versed in the genre and it allows them to turn horror conventions on their head. Ready Or Not is slick and it blends in humour in a way many horror films of the moment are trying and failing to accomplish. This film should have been released earlier in the summer, it definitely had the mileage.

(4 / 5)

The Lighthouse Cinema in Smithfield will be hosting the Dublin Feminist Film Festival again, from the 22nd to the 24th of August 2019.

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Our Countdown to this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival continues today, as we look at Careers in Film Day. One of several insightful events taking place during the festival, Careers in Film Day offers the opportunity for young people to learn from industry professionals about what it takes to forge out a career in film.

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We’re less than a week away from this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival and the anticipation is building quickly in the fair city of film. As the festival approaches, every day Film In Dublin will be counting down by highlighting one of the fascinating, fun and can’t miss events taking place during ADIFF 2018. Today, we highlight a public interview taking place on Saturday 3rd March with award-winning costume designer, Sandy Powell. Throughout a successful career in cinema, Powell has worked frequently with renowned directors including Martin Scorsese, Todd Haynes and Ireland’s own Neil Jordan. A twelve-time Oscar nominee, Powell has won the award on three occasions; for Shakespeare in Love, The Aviator and The Young Victoria.

 

Powell will be on hand during the festival to discuss her career, and with two films that that she has worked on featuring during ADIFF in Todd Haynes’ latest Wonderstruck the sci-fi rom-com How to Talk to Girls at Parties, there is sure to be a lot insight for ADIFF attendees. The host of the evening Eimer Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh is a considerable talent in costume design herself, with credits including Love and FriendshipThe Wind that Shakes the Barley and more.

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carolhttp://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carol

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WFT Ireland presents a masterclass in presenting your funding application and getting your project off the ground, courtesy of the funders themselves. Next Monday the 5th of February, WFTI will be hosting from the Morrison Hotel from 3.30 to 5.30, as industry professionals outline what it takes to write a killer funding application.

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Director: Hallie Meyers-Shyer Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Candice Bergen, Nico Alexander, Nat Wolff, Jon Rudnitsky Running Time: 97 minutes

First off, Home Again is not a rom-com. Don’t listen to what the critics want to tell you. It follows Alice, played with aplomb by Reese Witherspoon, who has recently left her man-child husband (Michael Sheen) in New York and returned to the restorative comforts of Los Angeles. With the help of her mother, she reclaims her identity and finds fulfilment.

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A Masterclass in directing comes to the Brooks Hotel on Drury Street next Monday, courtesy if the Women in Film and Television Ireland and the director Aisling Walsh. Following her latest film Maudie‘s showings at the Toronto Film Festival and ADIFF 2017, Walsh will be talking about directing and writing for the screen from 6-9pm next Monday, 29 May.

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Women in Horror Month is an international, grassroots initiative, which encourages supporters to learn about and showcase the underrepresented work of women in the horror industries. Whether they are on the screen, behind the scenes, or contributing in their other various artistic ways, it is clear that women love, appreciate, and contribute to the horror genre. Now in its 8th year, Women in Horror Month provides representation to those women, actively promoting do-it-yourself annual film screenings, blogs/articles, podcasts, and other forms of creative media with the goal of helping works by and featuring women reach a wider audience worldwide. Last year saw the first WiHM event to be held in Dublin and this Sunday, the Liquor Rooms on Wellington Quay will host the event for the first time.

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After tape traders in Nigeria decided to start shooting their own movies on (relatively cheap) videotape to keep their store shelves full, the output of the Nigerian film industry exploded. ‘Nollywood’ as it has been called is now second only to India in the number of films it puts out every year, ahead of even Hollywood, which simple can’t reboot Spider-Man often enough to match the amount of films Nigeria puts out every year. For Westerners, the volume of ‘Nollywood’ is one of the only things known about it, and as the industry continues to develop in Nigeria, it will be worth observing trends there and how they compare and contrast with those of America, or of our own film industry. The closing film of last weekend’s Feminist Film Festival Dublin, short documentary Amaka’s Kin: The Women of Nollywood provides one inportant perspective of Nigerian cinema, focusing on women working behind the camera in one of the world’s biggest hubs of film.

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