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This week marks Fingal Inclusion Week, an initiative led by Fingal County Council and the Fingal Public Participation Network. Over 35 events will take place across the County of Fingal from Monday 16th November to Saturday 21st November, all of which are free to attend and open to all.

As part of Fingal Inclusion Week this year, the Bleeding Pig Film Festival in association with the Bleeding Pig Cultural Festival, are presenting a free online programme of short Irish films. These shorts are about shifting attitudes, highlighting gender and LGBT issues in Ireland, include comedy and drama alike, presenting different perspectives under a common theme- the importance of acceptance and inclusion.

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With new releases thin on the ground once again, during November Film In Dublin are revisiting some notable releases during 2020 that we haven’t yet had the chance to review. In this Review Round-Up, we’re looking at a pair of films available now on Netflix that are essential viewing. Expect more recommendations in the next few weeks of films from this year that are worth accelerating up to the top of your catch-up list.

 

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.

An award-winning actor, writer, director, and producer, Maureen O’Connell is a recognisable name to anyone with an eye on the Irish film scene. Her short films, wide ranging comedies like Meitherhood or the 1916-themed Proclaim! are regular selections for any solid Irish festival programme. More recently, the director’s comedy feature Spa Weekend has been a hit at festivals home and abroad, screening in British and Irish festivals and last year winning the ‘She Is On Fire’ Award at the Female Filmmakers Festival in Berlin.

Keeping that fire lit, Maureen O’Connell is now organising the first Dublin International Comedy Film Festival. Taking place online from December 3rd and 4th, the festival promises to offer some much-needed winter levity with a selection of short and feature films.

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As we continue through lockdown, we continue at Film In Dublin to cast our net wider across the country, spotlighting some of the great festivals taking place outside our home county. Though this year they, as so many, have to go all-virtual, the Waterford Film Festival has a considerable pedigree. Now in its 14th year, the festival ought to be taking place in-person at the Central Arts Hall, but sadly the venue closed its doors permanently earlier this year, a sobering sign of what is at stake for arts and entertainment venues across the country.

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Filmmakers, film fans and other curious attendees mingled in the charming venue to enjoy mulled wine and hot chocolate before a screening of ten stunning short films at the iffy Short Film Festival last weekend.

The programme included eight films from Ireland and two international films with six of the shorts screened written and directed by women. Although the curators are clear to point out that a theme for the programme is never expressly chosen, this edition’s line up was very unique; touching on comedy, dance, theatre and horror all with an experimental twist.

Festival director Duncan McKenna had this to say about the festivals latest edition:

“iffy 4 was a resounding success. On the sellout night, there was a great vibe, good chats and 10 fantastic short films. For that we thank the volunteers, our sponsor Dept, and of course the filmmakers. We look forward to the next edition of iffy, and what that will become”

The winner of the “little iffy” award this year was  Legacy an experimental film by Derry-based writer and filmmaker Michael Barwise. Described as a journey into the collective gut of cats and Northern Ireland while exploring the lasting impact of violence and the domestication of trauma, the film was produced in association with Channel 4’s Random Acts and premiered on Film 4 as part of The Troubles on Film Season in September.

Describing the festival, director, writer and actor Anne Marie Kelly said:

This festival was a pleasure to attend. The organisers were lovely to deal with and they brought a cohesion to the audience experience with their enthusiasm and respect for film. Met some interesting professionals at the relaxed reception. Looking forward to the next one – I’ll be going for the pure enjoyment whether I have a film showing or not.

 

The fifth edition of iffy will take place on July 13th 2020. Submissions will be open to filmmakers from March 20th next year. Film fans can keep up to date with iffy on social media on Facebook , Twitter and Instagram

“A sick film made by sick people for sick people” was how Nicolas Roeg’s Bad Timing was described by its own distributors, and if that sounds like the kind of film you absolutely must see, Fillum and the Generator have you covered this November.

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November at the Irish Film Institute is always a treat for fans of French cinema and this year is no different. The IFI French Film Festival begins next Wednesday and tickets are selling fast for some of the big titles in this year’s season, running from November 13th – 24th.

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iffy, the short film festival on the Liffey have announced their array of short films for their upcoming 4th edition on Saturday 23rd of November at The Pearse Centre Theatre, Dublin 2 and tickets are now on sale. Ten shorts from Ireland and abroad will be showcased during the festival, presenting a great opportunity to see some of our best indie filmmakers at work and connect with upcoming talents both in front of and behind the camera.

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