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Films from Taiwan, mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam will all be shown online as part of this year’s East Asia Film Festival. Now in its 5th year, this celebration of international cinema is well-embedded in the calendar in the fair city of film, but as with many festivals in our current climate, this year it will be made more widely available as it moves all online. The 2021 East Asia Film Festival will be available later this month on the IFI@Home player.

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Director: Lee Isaac Chung  Starring: Steven Yeun, Han Ye-ri, Alan Kim, Noel Kate Cho, Youn Yuh-jung  Run Time: 115 minutes


 

The story of the immigrant experience is one that is very familiar to Irish audiences, all of whom know someone who has taken up and gone away, or who they themselves have been and gone, maybe coming back, maybe not. It’s challenging enough even when, very often for our own diaspora, you’re arriving in a place where a large amount of people are still like you, culturally speaking. To move from Korean to the United States, as the central Yi family has done in the events preceding Minari, is a significant shift itself. But to move from the city, with young kids and a tense marriage, all to try to make it on temperamental Arkansas farmland is an even tricker business altogether.

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A film exploring the unsung heroines of electronic music will receive a spotlight this International Women’s Day, thanks to the Irish Film Institute, AEMI and the folks at the Dublin Feminist Film Festival. Writer-director Lisa Rovner’s film Sisters with Transistors combines archive footage, interviews with experts and the stories of women creating in the world of electronic music themselves to reexamine the underplayed innovations by women in electronica.

 

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Gazing up at the stars, a man shares his expertise in finding constellations with his partner, one of a lifetime of small moments as bright and dazzling as anything in the night sky. Unfortunately, he for all his intelligence, he cannot recall the word ‘triangle’, and as time goes on, his memory of more and more things, big and small, fades into the void. Supernova is a story built around early onset dementia, but more than a shallow wallow in the sad nature of the disease, Harry Macqueen’s sensitive and measured approach uses the condition to explore the difficulty in saying goodbye, both to those you love and to yourself.

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A dynamic programme of contemporary Irish hip hop and R&B musicals is set to be one of the more enticing elements of this year’s Dublin International Film Festival. Playback x DIFF is a collabaration between musical and film talent, as some of Ireland’s biggest names in the music scene engage creatively with rising and risen directing talent, producing that mutual staple of behind the camera skill and alternative expression in rap and R&B: the music video.

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The full programme for this year’s all-online Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival has been announced. As the biggest film festival in the fair city of film moves all online, the Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2021 will serve as a celebration of the power of film to bring people together and explore the world in new ways. Taking place from 3-14 March 2021, the Festival has been re-imagined to bring audiences the best of new films and old classics, all while allowing people to attend the festival safely from their homes.  This year VMDIFF will be delivered via the screening portal Eventive.

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Over17 years, the Dublin International Film Festival has screened over over a thousand international films from countries all over the world as well as showcasing the work of Ireland’s very talented producers, directors, screenwriters and actors. The Festival has hosted over 600 major guests from the world of film, including Al Pacino, Angela Lansbury, Brendan Gleeson, Daniel Day-Lewis, Danny DeVito, Ennio Morricone and more. This year’s festival has announced one of the biggest current names in film on this side of the water will be participating as director Steve McQueen set to make an appearance in conversation with one of Ireland’s own leading lights.

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Dublin’s biggest film festival makes its return this March. Things will be different, but the biggest celebration of cinema in the fair city of film is scheduled to go ahead this Spring. The best of filmmaking from Ireland and around the world will be shared at VMDIFF 2021 in a new multi-platform programme to meet the challenges of our current times. The Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2021 will be a varied selection of films available in cinemas, outdoors and at home.

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Director: Lorcan Finnegan Starring: Imogen Poots, Jesse Eisenberg, Jonathan Aris Running Time: 97 minutes

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Even as news reports were starting to darken and arrive ever closer to our doors, while sitting in the sold out screening for the Opening Gala of VMDIFF 2020 it was difficult to imagine just how real Vivarium would become. Or how quickly the energy of a film premiere, glamorous stars ; a room packed full of people eagerly anticipating the uncertainty and possibilities of the immediate future, would feel like a bittersweet memory of oohhh, a billion years ago.

If Vivarium is a horror, it’s a horror about the domestic drudgery, a blunt jab at how social constructs can be so narrowly confined, widely expected and hellish to navigate that they can feel like a trap from which there is no escape. The fact that we all have to stay indoors right now with unknown and deadly consequences lurking ominously over us all the time has made the film’s blunt, exaggerated parody of suburbia very real in ways that director Lorcan Finnegan and writer Garret Shanley (who paired previously on Without Name) might never have anticipated when putting this story together, and it would be hard to blame the average viewer for running a mile from its ideas at the moment. The black joke has gotten a few shades darker, but the film is so committed to the bit, so giddily weird, it manages to pull off the delivery.

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