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One of the top festivals in the fair city of film will be returning this summer. Submissions are now open for short films for the Dublin Feminist Film Festival. For the last seven years, the festival has provided a platform for female filmmakers, aiming to inspire and empower others to get involved in filmmaking by considering women both in front of and behind the camera. After taking a hiatus in 2020 as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, the festival will be back in August 2021 and they’ve put the call out for short films now.

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In our latest Review Round-Up, we’re looking back at a pair of homegrown comedies that caught our eye at the 2021 Dublin International Film Festival. These Irish comedy films both have a dark sense of humour and a heartening sense of ingenuity, highlighting some of the best in filmmaking on our island.

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking quickfire questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.

With a storied career in theatre, television and film, writer, director, producer and performer Róisín Kearney is no stranger to those familiar with the Irish film scene. Her latest short film is Paddy, a story of identity soaked in 70s London Punk scene sweat. Funded by Creative Ireland and Clare Co Co, the short premiered last year at the Galway Film Fleadh and is one of the home-grown films currently available as part of this year’s Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival.

During DIFF, Film In Dublin got onto Róisín for a quick chat about her latest film, how her background in theatre has helped her in film and more.
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A film exploring the unsung heroines of electronic music will receive a spotlight this International Women’s Day, thanks to the Irish Film Institute, AEMI and the folks at the Dublin Feminist Film Festival. Writer-director Lisa Rovner’s film Sisters with Transistors combines archive footage, interviews with experts and the stories of women creating in the world of electronic music themselves to reexamine the underplayed innovations by women in electronica.

 

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Founded in 2009 by Hannah Neurotica, Women In Horror Month is an international grassroots initiative that assists female genre artists in gaining opportunities, exposure, and education through various events, printed material, articles, interviews, and online support. The vision is a world wherein all individuals are equally given the opportunity to create, share, and exploit their concept of life, pain, and freedom of expression. Every February, WiHM supporters host events (blood drives, film screenings, art shows), write blogs and articles, conduct interviews, and create videos and podcasts for mass consumption, and over the last number of years has been a regular part of the calendar here in the fair city of film. Womxn in Horror Month Ireland are hosting a number of events this month.

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Excitement is beginning to build for this year’s edition of the Dublin International Film Festival. With announcements gradually trickling out from VMDIFF and a full programme announcement taking place next week, the biggest film festival in the Dublin calendar will be upon us again soon and this year’s edition is going to the dogs, in the best way possible. The festival have announced that a dog-friendly screening will be taking place this year, a great opportunity to finally bring a bit of culture into the lives of Dublin’s philistine canines!

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The short film In Orbit is dedicated to “the daoine who loved and those who couldn’t”. It’s a sci-fi story, or at least, a story rooted in a future looking back, that provides an insightful perspective on recent events in Ireland’s changing society and the impact that has on the people who live in it.In Orbit former optician Maura recounts her life story in an interview with the Head Archivist of the Human Experience Records, going over her memories as she meets Amy, a bright academic with broken glasses. For the first time in forty years, Maura wants to share her life. The only catch is leaving behind the world as she knows it.

Following on from In Orbit winning Best Irish Short at the GAZE LGBT Film Festival for 2019, Film In Dublin spoke to writer and director Katie McNeice about her process in making the film, its focus and more.

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Screenwriter and director Sarah Ingersoll has got a fair bit of miles in while learning her craft. A graduate of The Glasgow School of Art, Sarah’s has a background in visual art and photography which informs her writing and filmmaking. After directing her first student film in 2016 through the Galway Film Centre, Sarah went on to study screenwriting at The New School in New York. In 2017 her feature script The Keeper was selected as a finalist for Best Inception and Best Overall Script at the Oaxaca Film Festival. Sarah’s short screenplay The Bridge was chosen for the 2018 GFC/RTE Short Film Commission and under the direction of Mark Smyth, the short premiered earlier this month at Galway Film Fleadh. The film tells the story of Cormac who after the sudden death of his parents must choose between returning to his home village in the west of Ireland to care for his estranged younger brother, and a bright future in Canada. She is a recipient of the New Writing Development Loan 2018 from Screen Ireland. Also in July, the iffy Short Film Festival screened Somebody, Somewhere, Who Looks After Critters,  Sarah’s debut documentary short which focuses on the life of Alex Scade runs a one man animal sanctuary from his self-built cabin on the edge of the Beara peninsula in the southwest of Ireland. Film In Dublin spoke with Sarah to talk screenwriting, directing and the Jurassic Park vibes of emus. Read more…

The Lighthouse Cinema in Smithfield will be hosting the Dublin Feminist Film Festival again, from the 22nd to the 24th of August 2019.

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Since graduating from the MET Film School in 2015, Megan K. Fox has been a prolific figure on the directing scene in Ireland. She has picked up awards and accolades for her short films Slow Down (2015), GIRL (2016), Calling Home (2017) and The Shift (2018), with another set for release this year in Cailín Álainn, a bilingual coming-of-age film about a transgender teen, which secured the inaugural Kerry Film Bursary and was shot this year 2019. Since being selected for selected for the RTÉ/Screen Skills Ireland’s New Directors Multi-Camera Training programme for continuing drama, Megan has been working with RTÉ, including earning her first TV credit this year for directing on Fair CityThe Shift, a comedy about young Denise (Fiona Bergin) desperate to get the shift at a Gaeltacht disco, has had continued success at festivals in Ireland and abroad since its release, most recently picking up the ‘little iffy’ award for best short at the July edition of the iffy Short Film Festival.  Film In Dublin caught up with Megan to talk about that success, film festivals, and working with other creatives, including the next generation of aspiring Irish directors.

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