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Director: Neasa Hardiman  Starring: Hermione Corfield, Connie Nielsen, Dougray Scott Running Time: 89 minutes

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From the visceral threat of Jaws to the unnerving nightmares of H.P. Lovecraft, the sea has always been a fertile breeding ground for horror. To cast characters adrift into vast, unexplored and uncaring waters means that they are exposed to one essential real-life fears – the instinctual anxiety that kicks in when a human is fundamentally and literally not on their home turf. Start adding freaky monsters into the mix and you can really start turning the screw, just as Irish director Neasa Hardiman has done in Sea Fever. Set aboard a small Irish fishing boat that becomes infested with aquatic parasites, the isolated ship mates become their own vessels and are as much at risk from each other as they are the horrors of the deep. What the film lacks in originality, knowingly but practically taking inspiration from classics like Alien and The Thing, it has gained considerably in timeliness. Let’s hope we don’t start seeing every movie through an “of-the-moment” lens, but if the lifejacket fits…

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Collectors of cult film curios Cabaret Noise are sounding off again, set to return to Stoneybatter in the spring with a new batch of the strange, underseen and interesting. From March through to May they’ll be hosting a trio of their well-curated and thought provoking presentations, deep from the deeper cuts of film.

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As far as Film In Dublin can recall, Hugh Jackman’s all-singing, all-dancing The Greatest Showman first screened in Dublin at James Joyce’s Volta Electric Theatre on the cinema’s opening day in 1909 and has been available for viewing in the fair city of film at least once a day in the century or so since… Honestly though there is no disputing that Showman has captured the hearts of audiences in a way that few films can these days, as evidenced by its long-running success at the box office. Later this month, the Axis Art Centre and Theatre in Ballymun will be putting a fresh spin on a screening of the beloved musical hit, as a local women’s dance troupe performs alongside the film.

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The 2019 edition of the Japanese Film Festival will feature as always a diverse and packed programme of films, including work from some of the most acclaimed filmmakers from contemporary Japanese cinema, and covers a variety of themes, genres and topics. Eagerly anticipated and already well-received films from Japan will be screened throughout. With this year 2019 marks the 11th year of The Embassy of Japan’s collaboration with access>cinema. With the help of various supporters, including the Ireland Japan Association and the Japan Foundation, JFF 2019 is set to bring the very best of Japanese cinema to Irish screens this April.

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Formerly the Chinese-Language Film Festival, the East Asia Film Festival Ireland has risen through the ranks of the Dublin cinema scene to become among the highlights of the festival calendar, offering outstanding East Asian cinema on an Irish stage. Classic films, hard-to-access current features and masterclasses from a diverse filmmaking perspective are on offer once again at this year’s festival, which takes place at the Irish Film Institute once again from April 11th until the 14th.

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Tomorrow evening sees the return of one of Dublin’s top purveyors of cult classic cinema. Hollywood Babylon are back and kicking off eight months of crowd-pleasers at the Light House Cinema, starting with a true grindhouse great; The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

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A series of classic road movies will be showing in Smithfield over the next week, as the Light House Cinema celebrates the arrival of the Road House Cinema to Smithfield Square.

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The Japanese Film Festival returns this weekend, bringing top quality Japanese cinema to Irish viewers throughout April. Now in it’s landmark 10th year, the 2018 edition of the festival will feature a diverse and densely packed programme of films, including work from some of the most acclaimed filmmakers from contemporary Japanese cinema. Probably Ireland’s most transnational festival, this year JFF will be hosting screenings at venues in Cork, Galway, Limerick, Tipperary, Sligo, Waterford, Dundalk and of course, Dublin, as part of a concerted effort to spread Japanese cinema and culture to as many Irish eyes as possible. We’ve got the full selection of films showing in the capital this month for you to go through.

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