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The current climate is one with a lot of uncertainty for us all, but it poses particular challenges for independent filmmakers. The already considerable difficulties of producing a film without grants or studio assistance takes on a whole new dimension when it comes to the new ground of actually getting your film released during increasingly long “strange times”.

One such film striving to get in front of audiences at this time if Irish indie feature Be Good or Be Gone. An entirely self-financed film from pre-production to post, this Dublin-set story is currently aiming for a theatrical release, and is set to screen soon for an Irish premiere at the Dublin Underground Film Festival.

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.

Director Shaun O’ Connor’s work has screened all over the world and won awards at various festivals, from DC to Dublin and Cork, where Shaun himself is based. He’s directed for television, on stage and for several advertising campaigns, but has received particular notice for his short films. His latest, A White Horse, has been a smash success on the Irish festival circuit over the last year, as an official selection at the Galway Film Fleadh, the Belfast Film Festival, the Cork and Waterford Film Festivals and VMDIFF 2020. Having won at the Oscar-qualifying Foyle Film Festival, A White Horse will be on the longlist for the Academy Awards in 2021.

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Later this month the experienced writer/producer Stephen Cleary will be in the fair city of film to provide two intriguing workshops on interest to budding storytellers on screen. Running next week with Film Network Ireland, the workshops will provide an opportunity to advance their knowledge of story structure, genre writing and more.

We decided to chat to Stephen on Power & Gender in Storytelling ahead of his upcoming workshop on the 23rd and 24th.

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The short film In Orbit is dedicated to “the daoine who loved and those who couldn’t”. It’s a sci-fi story, or at least, a story rooted in a future looking back, that provides an insightful perspective on recent events in Ireland’s changing society and the impact that has on the people who live in it.In Orbit former optician Maura recounts her life story in an interview with the Head Archivist of the Human Experience Records, going over her memories as she meets Amy, a bright academic with broken glasses. For the first time in forty years, Maura wants to share her life. The only catch is leaving behind the world as she knows it.

Following on from In Orbit winning Best Irish Short at the GAZE LGBT Film Festival for 2019, Film In Dublin spoke to writer and director Katie McNeice about her process in making the film, its focus and more.

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Screenwriter and director Sarah Ingersoll has got a fair bit of miles in while learning her craft. A graduate of The Glasgow School of Art, Sarah’s has a background in visual art and photography which informs her writing and filmmaking. After directing her first student film in 2016 through the Galway Film Centre, Sarah went on to study screenwriting at The New School in New York. In 2017 her feature script The Keeper was selected as a finalist for Best Inception and Best Overall Script at the Oaxaca Film Festival. Sarah’s short screenplay The Bridge was chosen for the 2018 GFC/RTE Short Film Commission and under the direction of Mark Smyth, the short premiered earlier this month at Galway Film Fleadh. The film tells the story of Cormac who after the sudden death of his parents must choose between returning to his home village in the west of Ireland to care for his estranged younger brother, and a bright future in Canada. She is a recipient of the New Writing Development Loan 2018 from Screen Ireland. Also in July, the iffy Short Film Festival screened Somebody, Somewhere, Who Looks After Critters,  Sarah’s debut documentary short which focuses on the life of Alex Scade runs a one man animal sanctuary from his self-built cabin on the edge of the Beara peninsula in the southwest of Ireland. Film In Dublin spoke with Sarah to talk screenwriting, directing and the Jurassic Park vibes of emus. Read more…

Since graduating from the MET Film School in 2015, Megan K. Fox has been a prolific figure on the directing scene in Ireland. She has picked up awards and accolades for her short films Slow Down (2015), GIRL (2016), Calling Home (2017) and The Shift (2018), with another set for release this year in Cailín Álainn, a bilingual coming-of-age film about a transgender teen, which secured the inaugural Kerry Film Bursary and was shot this year 2019. Since being selected for selected for the RTÉ/Screen Skills Ireland’s New Directors Multi-Camera Training programme for continuing drama, Megan has been working with RTÉ, including earning her first TV credit this year for directing on Fair CityThe Shift, a comedy about young Denise (Fiona Bergin) desperate to get the shift at a Gaeltacht disco, has had continued success at festivals in Ireland and abroad since its release, most recently picking up the ‘little iffy’ award for best short at the July edition of the iffy Short Film Festival.  Film In Dublin caught up with Megan to talk about that success, film festivals, and working with other creatives, including the next generation of aspiring Irish directors.

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On Saturday 29th June, pianist Máire Carroll will be bringing her piano along to the Light House Cinema for a one night only musical event, “Reimagining the Movies“. An extensive performer worldwide and a winner of  numerous awards including the 2018 RDS Collins Memorial Prize, 2015 Tilestyle Artist Bursary and the 2012 RDS Music Bursary, Carroll will be performing some of her iconic film scores by some of cinema’s most loved composers alongside a number of guests, along with the premiere of her latest composition specially composed for the evening.

Ahead of her performance on Saturday, Film In Dublin spoke with the musician about the power of music on screen, her work and influences and more.

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Ahead of the release of Irish horror The Hole in the Ground, Film In Dublin caught up with director Lee Cronin and star Séana Kerslake to chat about filming in the forest, working with young actor James Quinn Markey and more.

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.

Hazardous Materials is a short film that looks at anxiety completely visually, without spoken dialogue, in an effort to convey something of the main character’s perspective on the world. Nora has trouble talking to anyone, and is scraping by day to day avoiding contact with people, while Rachel, a well meaning co-worker, wants to bring her out of her shell. When Rachel invites Nora to a house party – how will Nora react? The short has had considerable success at screenings so far, including a UK Premiere for World Mental Health Day and showings at 5 festivals/competitions to date.

Galway-based director Brian O’Brien has directed a number of shorts, but Hazardous Materials marks an impressive step forward for the developing director. Film In Dublin spoke to Brian for the direct line on his work.

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.


Short film The Observer Effect is a dark thriller with vivid imagery, telling the story of a man and a woman with a mysterious connection whose paths, when crossed, are destined to lead to a violent end. An impressive debut from director Garret Walsh, with an immersive feeling of dread and remarkable production design, the short has had considerable success on the film festival circuit, showing at the likes of the Richard Harris International Film Festival, the Silk Road Film Festival and more, picking up award nominations and wins along the way.

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