Follow Me

Close

The Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2020 is in full swing and tomorrow one of the biggest parts of the festival every year will take place: the screening of the surprise film. A closely guarded secret by festival organisers, not even the projectionist knows what the film is going to be until the lights go down and the film begins. Some have been excellent, some have been awful, but the anticipation is always killer.

Read more…

The 2020 Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival has finally arrived. The biggest event in the year for film in Dublin (and Film In Dublin) officially gets started this Wednesday evening with the Opening Gala screening of Vivarium, Lorcan Finnegan’s sci-fi thriller. Cinephiles from all over the island and beyond will be zipping back and forth in the fair city of film over the next twelve days, checking out screenings and events in a packed programme.

Read more…

With the Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival kicking off next week, anticipation is building for a few weeks of exciting screenings, intriguing events and of course, the DIFF Discovery Award. The Discovery Award at identifies, supports and encourages new and emerging talent in the Irish film industry, both in front of and behind the camera. Thirteen emerging talents have been nominated for this year’s Award, with the winner to be announced on the closing day of the festival, Sunday 8 March, 2020. Ahead of the beginning of DIFF, Film In Dublin reached out to some of the nominees to get a better sense of their creative influences, nominated works and views on the industry today.

Read more…

Excitement is beginning to build for this year’s edition of the Dublin International Film Festival. With announcements gradually trickling out from VMDIFF and a full programme announcement taking place next week, the biggest film festival in the Dublin calendar will be upon us again soon and this year’s edition is going to the dogs, in the best way possible. The festival have announced that a dog-friendly screening will be taking place this year, a great opportunity to finally bring a bit of culture into the lives of Dublin’s philistine canines!

Read more…

Director: Marie Monge Starring: Stacy Martin, Tahar Rahim Running Time: 105 minutes


It’s common practice for films in France to have very different titles in their native tongue than in the translated English. Marie Monge’s Treat Me Like Fire goes by the more straightforward Joueurs (“Players”) when shown at home, as it was during last year’s Cannes Film Festival. They seem like very different names at a glance but both ultimately have the same energy; Treat Me Like Fire a Lana Del Rey-ven cigarette exhale on the film’s story of burning, fleeting, dangerous romance, while “Players” is more Stevie Nicks to the ears, an indication not just of the film’s gambling content but of the general circumstances under which players will love you.

Read more…

Director: Wanuri Kahiu Starring: Samantha Mugatsia, Sheila Munyiva Running Time: 82 minutes


One of 2018’s more underseen and personable films in a collection of new romantic comedies was Love Simon , a queer teen romance that managed to jog where other films had once walked, allowing itself to focus funly, freely and  matter-of-factly on the romance of its gay lead in a setting where other obstacles where pointedly settled. Wanuri Kahiu’s story of queer African adolescence deserves plenty of props for following in that vein as much as it can, focusing on the falling stage of two young Kenyan girls’ romance in spite of and beyond the very real national contextRafiki is a delicate but vibrant love story, a smile that can’t help breaking out.

Read more…

The announcements are starting to roll in for the Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2019 and frankly there might not be many more exciting that the news that comedy classic The Muppet Movie is going to be screening all over the fair city of film this February, as part of VMDIFF19’s Fantastic Flix programme.

Read more…

Director: Christopher McQuarrie Starring: Tom Cruise, Henry Cavill, Rebecca Ferguson, Ving Rhames, Simon Pegg, Sean Harris, Vanessa Kirby, Angela Bassett, Alec Baldwin Running Time: 147 minutes


A preface: When Tom Cruise found out that a member of the Spielberg family was seeing a psychiatrist, he had faithful Scientologist acolytes, who hate psychiatry, picket the doctor at their home. Scientologists assigned the actress (and member) Nazanin Boniadi to be Cruise’s new girlfriend post Penelope Cruz, pre-Katie Holmes, dumped her for a perceived sleight to Scientology honcho David Miscavige and when Boniadi expressed her disappointment, the church punished her with months of menial labour, digging ditches and cleaning toilets with a toothbrush. He publicly criticised Brooke Shields for using anti-depressants when she had post-partum depression. He had Nicole Kidman’s phone tapped, and after divorcing Kidman (whom Scientology never approved of because her father was a well-known psychologist back in Australia), Cruise turned their two children against her with the help of the church, to the point that they now call her a ‘Suppressive Person’ and Kidman doesn’t count the two when thanking her children in speeches…it’s just worth keeping in mind sometimes that Cruise is a highly-wound maniac in deep with a cult that manipulates and abuses members and neglects children, before launching into effuse praise of his work. It might well be the intense ethic that Scientology has developed in Cruise, or his eagerness to have people forget his off-putting mid-00s energy, that sees him so heavily devoted to making the Mission: Impossible series go from strength-to-stength as one of Hollywood’s most innovative action franchise. The latest installment Fallout, breaks new ground for the series, pushing it to the most berserk heights yet. Really berserk.

Read more…

Director: Andrew Haigh Starring: Charlie Plummer, Steve Buscemi, Travis Fimmel, Chloë Sevigny, Steve Zahn Runtime: 121 Minutes

Lean On Pete is one of those rare films that values authenticity over sentimentality. No Hollywood sheen tints the lens. No overstated points on rural America’s current economic climate are made. No faux sense of understanding for the countryside’s cuts and bruises is offered up. Instead, Lean On Pete uses an understated approach, opting for honest storytelling over cheap mawkishness. The characters that occupy this land and the stories they tell are important to the filmmakers, yet nothing is ever overly dramatic or artificial.

It is here that we are introduced to Charley Thompson (Plummer); a young boy who traverses the blistering Oregon deserts to find his last known relative living thousands of miles away. Accompanying Charley on his journey is Lean On Pete, a failing racehorse who Charley forms a great bond with after securing a summer job in a local stables. Although it seems like a simple story on the outside, Lean On Pete is told with wonderful tenderness, compassion and sincerity, making for one of the most devastatingly beautiful movies of 2018.

Read more…