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Director: Wes Anderson Starring: Bill Murray, Owen Wilson, Tilda Swinton, Benicio Del Toro, Léa Seydoux, Adrien Brody, Frances McDormand, Timothée Chalamet, Lyna Khoudri, Jeffrey Wright, Stephen Park… Running Time: 103 minutes


Wes Anderson, 52 years old, American filmmaker, accused auteur, verified eclectic, has a long-standing and well-founded reputation for cinematic confection, and audience Marmite.

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The trailer for the latest film by Jon Wright, director of the Irish cult class Grabbers has arrived and it continues that film’s spirit of strange local horrors. Reuniting the creative team behind that creature feature, Unwelcome hints at something strange going on just beyond the woods of a home of a young British couple, a home in which you could say they are…un…wanted.

 

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Following on from Culture Night’s event Dublin Will Be Written in My Heart, which showed off the city through the eyes of its filmmakers, another Fillum event will be finding its way to the Circular Bar this Halloween season, a night with a twist. Dublin After Dark will show a different side of the city, not strictly horror, but a darker shade of shorts, all screening on Friday 29th October.

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Director: Denis Villeneuve Starring: Timothee Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Zendaya, Jason Momoa, Josh Brolin, Stellan Skarsgaard, Dave Bautista, Javier Bardem, Sharon Duncan-Brewster Running Time: 156 minutes

 


 

Frank Herbert’s Dune is today considered one of the sci-fi forefathers, a richly told epic with much on its mind and an influence on everyone, from George Lucas to Hayao Miyazaki. Adapting the story itself on screen has proven…challenging, for many reasons, the material dense on its own merits and a challenge to capture the eye of audiences without everything that drew from it already obscuring the view.

 

 

Where Jodorowsky failed and David Lynch befuddled, now Denis Villeneuve steps in with a new effort to make Dune a success. His weapon of choice is the modern blockbuster model, a brutalist exercise in asserting box-office through sheer force of will. Every tool in the arsenal – the all-star cast, the source material devotion, the enormous runtime, the spoiler seclusion and sequel hooks – they’re all out there to get Dune over and get the Part Two in future that this film’s opening title implies, fans, stans and studios. The drive is considerable, and tautological: Dune here is a big name franchise because it looks like, moves like and is certainly budgeted like a big name franchise.

 

 

Has it got ambition? Unquestionably. Scale? Massively. Heart? Well. Um.

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If like me, you spend too much of your time mindlessly scrolling through Twitter, you may have seen videos of kids who improbably love Michael Myers, the iconic indestructible mass murderer from the Halloween series. It’s October, which means these videos are more likely to find their way to your timeline, but it does seem striking that so many pre-teen kids are so into the hulking, homicidal Shape. They dance with Michael Myers, they wear his mask, they hug him, they freak out with joy when he comes to their birthday party. But Michael Myers is terrifying, right? Why would small children imprint so cutely onto someone that is, in the words of leading health professional Doctor Loomis, “simply evil”?

 



The latest film in the franchise Halloween Kills is in cinemas now, and while we could give you a review, an editorial decision has been made that it is more important to mitigate your confusion if you find yourself sharing a cinema row with a group of tiny Myers stans. What are they doing there, you’ll wonder. Don’t they know this film is rated 18s? Where are the parents? Michael Myers is terrorising Jamie Lee Curtis again on screen right now…so why are they flossing??


It sounds like a bone-chilling prospect. But to mitigate any fears that you might have about being swarmed by a murderous pack of killer-worshippers, your final, blood-choked screams being turned into cute viral content, read this and be put at ease. It’s all very innocent really. Here are the five reasons why kids love Michael Myers.
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The French Film Festival is one of the top events on offer every year at the Irish Film Institute. A seasonal soiree embraced by local Francophiles and expatriated film fans alike, the festival offers a great mix of new hits from France and classic cinema, offering a venue for cultural exchange that brings us closer together as the year begins to draw to a close. The IFI French Film Festival 2021 will be taking place from November 17th until the 28th. A blended approach will be available next month, with films on offer in-cinema at the IFI in Temple Bar, and online on IFI@Home.

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Director: Andy Serkis Starring: Tom Hardy, Woody Harrelson, Michelle Williams, Naomie Harris, Stephen Graham, Reid Scott Running Time: 97  minutes


 

The experience of watching the original Venom was an exercise in realising that its chaotic energy, slapdash editing, nonsensical plot and over the top (of the lobster tank) performance by Tom Hardy, all of the things that would in theory make it Not Good, in fact made the film a breath of fresh air. Venom, the Xtreme muscle-bound badass who kills and calls people turds in the wind while he does it, may be a relic of the 90s, but improbably his film and Hardy’s go-hard acting successfully revisited the factors that made that kind of character popular in the first place, and at a stage of superhero films where even the gun-wielding raccoons are looking mournfully into the middle distance and feeling the toll of being a Hero, it’s fun and freeing to watch a comic book character that’s pure Id unleashed. Let There Be Carnage embraces and expands on the previous film’s reception. A wild, weird ride, this sequel is nothing less than a full on, fully sincere coming-out party for the symbiote.

 

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Director: Tomás Ó Súilleabháin Starring: Dónall Ó Héalai, Saise Ní Chuinn, Dara Devaney Running Time: 86 minutes


 

“This was done to us” someone says of the Famine at one point in Arracht, and taking that fact as a given is the jumping off point for the ideas that director Tomás Ó Súilleabháin has on his mind in directing this take on Ireland’s history. Taking the Famine as directly driven by British imperialism as opposed to an unfortunate potato happenstance isn’t mere political point scoring, like Black 47 it allows for a more personal, character-driven story to be unfurled in response to the act. Genocide is ultimately and emphatically dehumanising, and Arracht, meaning ‘monster’, is a story of what becomes of those who have what was done to us, well, done to them.

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Film festivals continue to return across Ireland, and in the midlands this month you can experience a five-day event for film fans and pros alike in the Offline Film Festival. Since 2010 they’ve brought the best of the big screen to Birr, and a selection of screenings and events begins today as the film festival runs 13 – 17th October.

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Director: David Lowery Starring: Dev Patel, Alicia Vikander, Sean Harris, Sarita Choudhury, Joel Edgerton, Barry Keoghan Running Time: 130 minutes


‘The noble knight’ may be one of the original and best exercises in brand management, a close association forged between valour and jobs for the boys that may not really have reflected reality. Knights may have had a code alright, so do pirates. But even, or especially, when we’re telling myths and legends, we can’t help but tell on ourselves.

The original poem of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a tale of a servant of the realm who gets puffed up by his own importance, acts rashly and violently and is deceitful in his efforts to be honorable. When his dishonesty is revealed, Gawain is declared the most blameless knight in all the land and all the other knights wear a symbol of his adventure as a reminder to always be honest. Sounds a bit like Gawain was “one bad apple” that inspired some spurious reforms to me, and what’s interesting about David Lowery’s take on the legend is the ways in which it builds the gap between the stories that we tell and the cold, harsh reality, and how Dev Patel’s Gawain is used to explore the ways that actually, All Knights Are Bastards.

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