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The 2018 Irish Film and Television Academy Film and Drama Awards were held in Dublin last night. The awards, a celebration of the last year for Irish talent, Irish film and scripted drama, took place in the Mansion House, with Deirdre O’Kane hosting the occasion. Frank Berry’s Michael Inside was among the big winners on the night, picking up the award for Best Film. Aisling Walsh was the winner of Best Director for her work on Maudie, while stars Saoirse Ronan, Barry Keoghan and Cillian Murphy were among the winners in the acting categories. John Connors, star of hit crime drama Cardboard Gangsters, was the winner in the Best Actor category, and made a moving speech celebrating his success in spite of the difficulty he faces getting cast as a member of the Travelling community.

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The Irish Film and Television Academy commenced its 15th anniversary year today with the announcement of their line-up of nominations for the 2018 IFTA Awards.

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It has been a year. In 2017 there was a lot for film fans to contemplate, but in what they say on the screen and in the wider film business. Month after month, entertaining, challenging and interesting films found their way onto Irish screens, either from Hollywood or any number of our own talented Irish directors. It was a year where the sickeningly pervasive culture of abuse in cinema was thrust into the headlines by brave survivors no longer willing to suffer in silence. It was also a year in great filmmaking, where talented, diverse directors were given the opportunity to show their talent, several for the first time, where performances transported us just as believably to the far-off future, the underprivileged, overlooked present and even outside the fluid realm of time altogether. This is Film In Dublin’s list of the best films of 2017, the films that moved us, entertained us, opened our eyes and otherwise expressed everything that cinema is meant to be, in a year that showed that cinema doesn’t always achieve those lofty ideals behind the scenes.

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The Dublin Feminist Film Festival celebrates female filmmakers, with the aim of inspiring and empowering more female involvement in filmmaking. The films screened at the festival consider women both on screen and behind it, showcasing stories told by and about women. For four years the festival has showcased great films by women from Ireland and abroad and involved women in film in discussions about their work, and the festival returns November 16 – 18 for a weekend of films that look to the future of women in cinema.

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It’s time to get cultured film fans. Culture Night 2017 takes place this Friday 22 September, with venues and public spaces across the Ireland opening their doors to free evenings of entertainment. Culture Night has been running for 13 years now and 2017 promises to be its biggest programme to date, with live music, poetry, workshops of all kinds and more taking place all over the country. What this means of course is that this Friday, the fair city of film is going to be even busier than ever, with dozens of events taking place that will appeal to cinephiles of all ages. From kid-friendly workshops with the geniuses at Cartoon Saloon to short film screenings and more, there’s loads to do and not all in places you might expect (ever been to a movie screening at the co-op?). With the help of Culture Night we’ve compiled everything film-related taking place all across Dublin on Culture Night 2017 for you to check out, along with what’s on, when, where and the websites.

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Budding female cinematographers will be glad to hear that on Saturday the 12th of August, Women in Film & Television Ireland are bringing a DOP masterclass to Brooks Hotel. The event will run from 11am to 12pm.

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Director: Emer Reynolds ‘Starring’: Voyager 1, Voyager 2 Running Time: 121 minutes


While the primary goal of a documentary is to be informative, the best ones always distinguish themselves by being visually interesting. They are after all, still movies, not lectures and the best cases for filmed documentary are made by taking advantage of the medium and providing images that remain in the mind where facts and figures can find it easier to break free. In Irish director Emer Reynold’s space-faring doc The Farthest, a combination of interviews, well-selected archive footage and photographs and impressive computer-generated imagery come together to tell the story of the NASA’s Voyager mission in a truly beautiful fashion. It’s easy to feel the awe of space exploration when it looks as good as this.

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Science fiction doesn’t always have to be about laser beams and Ewoks. For those who like the science in their films to be a little harder in nature, the Irish Film Institute is offering a series of films, both fact and fiction, that explore and incorporate plausible scientific methods and practices into their stories. These are the thinking person’s films about science and they’re on offer next week at the IFI.
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