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Director: J. A. Bayona Starring: Bryce Dallas Howard, Chris Pratt, Isabella Sermon Running Time: 128 minutes

The central conflict of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom isn’t about dinosaurs, it’s not even about being pro-dino rights or pro-bioweapons. The central conflict is the friction caused by J. A. Bayona’s directing style bumping against the constraints of this franchise, like a T-rex testing an electric fence who can’t help getting burnt.

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Director: Jon Watts Starring: Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, Marisa Tomei, Robert Downey Jr Running Time: 133 minutes


In recent years, the behind the scenes efforts of non-Marvel studios attempts to make films with Marvel characters could make compelling movie material all on its own. Specifically, comedy-of-errors movies. The chaos reportedly caused during the awful 2015 reboot of Fantastic Four by director Josh Trank (and his little dogs too) is one example. The leaked e-mail fiasco showing out-of-touch exec’s attempts to make an EDM-loving, humble-bragging hero that’s down with the kids for the ill-fated, ever spin-off proposing Amazing Spider-Man series is another. The lack of financial success made by the Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone-starring Spidey movies led to an “if you can’t beat them, join them” rethink and Sony drafted in Marvel Studios to help produce a reboot, with Sony retaining film distribution rights and Marvel masters Disney controlling merchandising rights. After a popular cameo in last year’s Captain America Civil War, Spider-Man: Homecoming sees Marvel’s most beloved comics character take centre-stage once again. From the orchestral arrangement of the classic 60’s Spider-Man cartoon theme that opens this film onwards, the effort to bring the character (or more cynically, the IP) back to its roots is clear. This is a younger, more innocent Spider-Man, and the film is refreshing for that, even while the creative constraints of being part of the MCU never go away.

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Director: David Ayer Starring: Will Smith, Margot Robbie, Viola Davis, Joel Kinnaman, Jay Hernandez, Jared Leto, Jai Courtney, Cara Delevingne Run Time: 130 minutes.


There are reviews out there that would have you believe that this film is a travesty; something to be avoided at all costs. Thankfully, it’s not quite that bad. Ok yes, if we’re being honest Suicide Squad is a complete and utter mess of a movie, but there’s still a lot to enjoy about it. For all of its flaws it’s surprisingly entertaining. The premise is somewhat original, the cast give it their all, and at the end of the day the whole thing just kind of works despite itself.Read more…

Don’t you want to see this face on the big screen?

nicholas-cage-faceoff

 

Well, that dream is about to become a reality, as Hollywood Babylon presents MONDO CAGE with Face/Off (1997) at the Lighthouse cinema on Saturday, August 13th at 10:45 PM. Cage delivers his performance here with his trademark gusto as the twisted criminal mastermind Castor Troy. John Travolta shares Cage’s limelight as Special Agent Sean Archer, the Batman to Cage’s Joker. Archer is doubly motivated in exacting justice against Troy because not only is he a terrorist, sadist and all round nasty piece of work, he was also responsible for the death of the Special Agent’s son.

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In  Movie Memories, the notable and quotable from all over Dublin reminisce about their formative film experiences. From date movie disasters to a first time with a classic, they recall it all.

Dr. Harvey O’Brien keeps a lot of plates spinning in the Irish film scene, teaching Film Studies at UCD, co-editing Film and Film Culture and serving as a member of the Irish Film Institute’s Board of Directors. He’s been a regular on RTÉ Radio One’s ‘Classic Movies’ slot and is the author of Action Movies: The Cinema of Striking Back (2012) and The Real Ireland (2004), and co-editor of Keeping it Real (2004). Harvey strives to keep the big and loud blockbusters in the conversation of Important Cinema and for the first Movie Memories, Film In Dublin spoke with him about the blockbusters of his youth, how modern movies measure up and the best approach to remakes and reboots.

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Director: Paul Feig Starring: Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, Leslie Jones Running Time: 116 minutes

Undesirable baggage has followed the Ghostbusters remake from the moment it was first announced. For some, the sheer horror of women being chosen to get slimed while putting ghosts in a box in a movie for children has prompted a lot of teeth gnashing, keyboard smashing and toys being thrown from the pram (though not literally, can’t depreciate the value of that fully poseable Peter Venkman). The level of vitriol is, of course, unwarranted. Lo and behold a Ghostbusters movie starring women did not lead to dogs and cats living together or anything of that sort but instead to a funny if inconsistent movie.

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