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Director: J.J. Abrams Starring: Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, Oscar Isaac, Adam Driver, Domhnall Gleeson, Naomi Ackie, Richard E. Grant, Lupita Nyong’o, Keri Russell, Kelly Marie Tran, Billy Dee Williams, Ian McDiarmid, Carrie Fischer, Mark Hamill, Anthony Daniels, Joonas Suotamo Running Time: 142 minutes

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If there is one thing we can surely all agree on, it’s that conversation around Star Wars has long since become exhausting. The most popular thing in the world seems destined to be endlessly divisive, drafted unwittingly into assorted sides of the culture wars, something that has gone from nerd fixation to an inescapable franchise conveyor belt. Surely we can all agree that a children’s movie about lasers and space goblins shouldn’t be taken too seriously one way or another. If you couldn’t care less about The Rise of Skywalker with all the baggage it has, it would be hard to blame you. If you watch it and enjoy the film’s spectacle and fan service, more power to you. But in trying to wrestle with the considerable backlash to The Last Jedi, while both concluding a nine film saga and keeping the franchise in good enough favour to continue into the future all while also also trying (one hopes) to be a functioning narrative and entertaining film in its own right, is all too much for one film to rise above. Instead, it falls down a bit of a pit, but has that ever been much of a problem where Star Wars is concerned? It never quite seems to kill things off the way it should.

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We at Film In Dublin like to think that we know what you, the cinema-going public of Dublin, want. What you really, really want. And we know there are loads of you out there who spent the 90s bopping along to the Spice Girls, taking quizzes to see if you were Ginger, Scary, Posh, Baby or Sporty and trying to understand what exactly zigazig ah was and what was so desirable about it, so you’ll be delighted to hear that the Light House Cinema will be showing the pop fivesome’s film Spice World this September.

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Director: Patrick Hughes Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Samuel L. Jackson, Selma Hayek, Gary Oldman Running Time: 118 minutes


Movies won’t appreciate what they have in Samuel L. Jackson until he’s gone. Not the highest highs, the Djangos, but the long, long list of unmemorable, mediocre or outright awful productions that have been raised one bar higher by the sheer presence of Jackson and the level and legitimacy he brings to every performance. The Hitman’s Bodyguard is a better film than many of those, but it’s many rougher edges are a lot easier to look past when Jackson is cackling hard at the latest inconvenience he’s caused Ryan Reynolds, the titular bodyguard to his titular hitman. Recalling many of the dumb but cheerful odd couple action movies of the 1980, here the at-odds pair’s chemistry is just strong enough to prop up a deeply misguided plot international intrigue, which aims to be something like a comedic episode of 24 but is more like an episode of Chuck if they were allowed to say motherfucker.

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Way back in the long, long ago of the year 2000, a schedule over-run in the shooting of Mission Impossible II meant that Dougray Scott would have to be replaced as Wolverine in the then-upcoming X-Men. A young, mostly unknown Australian named Hugh Jackman took his place. Jackman has appeared as Wolverine in every X-Men film ever since, surviving a trilogy, solo spin-off and reboot, thanks to his healing factor. Or because Hugh Jackman is pretty good at playing Wolverine. Longer than Sean Connery played James Bond, longer than the wait between either set of Star Wars trilogies, long enough to possibly (hopefully) see one Clinton out of the White House and another back in, Hugh Jackman has been the best in the world at what he does, and what he does isn’t very nice, bub.

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