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The nominations for the 91st edition of the Academy Awards have now been announced. The eyes of film fans from across the world will be on the Dolby Theatre next month, teary eyes, eyes agog, eyes rolling, but all nonetheless focused on this years offering of big Hollywood bru ha ha over the next celebrated films in Hollywood this year. Kumail Nanjiani and Tracee Ellis Ross announced the nominees for this year’s Oscars this afternoon.

There will be no host at this year’s Oscars according to reports, after initially announced host Kevin Hart dropped out following online backlash against previous homophobic tweets that he had made.

Irish production The Favourite from Element Pictures has received 10 nominations for this year’s Oscars including  nods for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actress, making it the most nominated film of this year’s awards alongside Alfonso Cuaraon’s Roma. Dubliner Robbie Ryan received a nomination also for Best Cinematography for  The Favourite, while two shorts directed by Irish directors also picked up nominations.

Louise Bagnall’s  Late Afternoon, produced by Cartoon Saloon, received a nomination for Best Animated Short. Bagnall’s film follows a woman with dementia as she seeks to reassemble past memories. The film available to view now was given a shout out yesterday in our interview with Brian O’Brien as a must-watch. There was a nomination also for Best Live-Action Short for Irish director Vincent Lambe’s controversial film Detainment. The short, which is an assembly of transcripts of interviews with the boys convicted of the Jamie Bulger murders in the 1990s, has already drawn angry criticism from the victim’s family. This year’s ceremony is set to take place on Sunday, February 24th, 2019. We have the full list of this year’s nominations available now:

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Director: Craig Gillespie Starring: Margot Robbie, Sebastian Stan, Allison Janney, Paul Walter Hauser Running Time: 120 minutes

At the inaugural turn of the 24-hour news cycle, around-the-clock coverage meant that more people had access to stories from across the globe. By the early 90s before white broncos sped down Los Angeles highways or actors were caught in suspicious alleys, one particular celebrity scandal in the US crossed the pond to make international headlines; the feud between olympic figure skaters Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding.

As a result of constant media coverage, Harding’s story was elevated from local crime to worldwide scandal overnight, as people lined up to watch the downfall of this notable figure and Olympic hopeful. Now, years later, director Craig Gillespie and star/producer Margot Robbie have joined forces to bring us I, Tonya, a black comedy based on the shocking and wildly contradictory first-hand accounts of all those involved.

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Director: Paul Thomas Anderson Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis, Vicky Krieps, Lesley Manville Running Time: 130 minutes


Throughout his long and acclaimed career, Daniel Day-Lewis has embodied personalities that burst forth from the screen, simply too powerful, or imposing, or strong of will to be restrained by mere celluloid and silver. From Christy Brown to Daniel Plainview to Abraham-by-God-Lincoln, DDL has method acted his way through dominating characters, willing audiences into awe, the most impressive man in the room when he isn’t really in it. In his supposed last performance, as the wonderfully and ludicrously named Reynolds Woodcock, DDL applies that same level of performance and applies it to a fussy dressmaker in the immaculate fashion scene of 1950s London. Working once again with Paul Thomas Anderson, the pair have taken what may seem at first glance to be an understated love story and intricately sown some of their best work just underneath the surface, a beautiful piece of work with as many hidden thrills as anything their fascinating main character himself might design.

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We’re less than a week away from this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival and the anticipation is building quickly in the fair city of film. As the festival approaches, every day Film In Dublin will be counting down by highlighting one of the fascinating, fun and can’t miss events taking place during ADIFF 2018. Today, we highlight a public interview taking place on Saturday 3rd March with award-winning costume designer, Sandy Powell. Throughout a successful career in cinema, Powell has worked frequently with renowned directors including Martin Scorsese, Todd Haynes and Ireland’s own Neil Jordan. A twelve-time Oscar nominee, Powell has won the award on three occasions; for Shakespeare in Love, The Aviator and The Young Victoria.

 

Powell will be on hand during the festival to discuss her career, and with two films that that she has worked on featuring during ADIFF in Todd Haynes’ latest Wonderstruck the sci-fi rom-com How to Talk to Girls at Parties, there is sure to be a lot insight for ADIFF attendees. The host of the evening Eimer Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh is a considerable talent in costume design herself, with credits including Love and FriendshipThe Wind that Shakes the Barley and more.

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carolhttp://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carol

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The nominations for the 90th edition of the Academy Awards have now been announced. Tiffany Haddish and Andy Serkis announced the nominees for the 2018 Academy Awards live from the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in the morning in the US, with Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, expected to be among the front-runners in the race for Best Picture. Guillhermo Del Toro’s The Shape of Water led the way in the number of nominations, with 13. Greta Gerwig became the first woman to be nominated for Best Director since Katheryn Bigelow in 2009, while Jordan Peele was nominated in the same category for Get Out. Saoirse Ronan received her latest award nomination in the Best Actress category (her third Oscar nomination), while The Breadwinner, made by Irish animation studio Cartoon Saloon, was among the nominees for best animated feature. Daniel Day-Lewis, in what is reported to be his final acting role, received a nomination for Best Actor for his performance in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread. Irish costume designer Consolata Boyle also received the third nomination of her career, for her work on Victoria and Abdul.

This year’s ceremony, to be hosted by Jimmy Kimmell, will take place the 4th of March. See the full list of nominations below:

Best picture

 

Call Me By Your Name
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Post
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best cinematography

Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

 

Best supporting actor

Willem Dafoe – The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins – The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer – All the Money in the World
Sam Rockwell – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best documentary

Faces Places
Icarus
Last Men in Aleppo
Strong Island

Best foreign language film

A Fantastic Woman (Chile)
On Body and Soul (Hungary)
The Insult  (Lebanon)
Loveless  (Russia)
The Square (Sweden)

Best actor

Timothée Chalamet – Call Me by Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis – Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya – Get Out
Gary Oldman – Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington – Roman J. Israel, Esq

Best costume design

Beauty and the Beast
Darkest Hour
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Victoria and Abdul

Best score

Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

 

Best song

Remember Me (from Coco)
Mystery of Love (from Call Me By Your Name)
This Is Me (from The Greatest Showman)
Mighty River (from Mudbound)
Stand Up For Something (from Marshall)

Best sound editing

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best sound mixing

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

 

Best documentary short

Edith & Eddie
Heaven is a Traffic Jam
Heroin(e)

Knifeskills
Traffic Stop

Best production design

Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water

 

Best original screenplay

The Big Sick
Get Out
Lady Bird
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best adapted screenplay

Call Me By Your Name
The Disaster Artist
Logan
Molly’s Game
Mudbound

Best animated feature

The Boss Baby

The Breadwinner

Coco

Ferdinand

Loving Vincent

Best animated short

Dear Basketball
Garden Party
Lou
Negative Space
Revolting Rhymes

Best live-action short

Dekalb Elementary
The 11 O’Clock
My Nephew Emmett
The Silent Child
All Of Us

 

Best supporting actress

Mary J. Blige – Mudbound
Allison Janney – I, Tonya
Leslie Manville – Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf – Lady Bird
Octavia Spencer – The Shape of Water

Best film editing

Baby Driver
Dunkirk
I, Tonya
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best actress

Sally Hawkins – The Shape of Water
Frances McDormand – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie – I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird
Meryl Streep – The Post

Best director

Christopher Nolan – Dunkirk
Jordan Peele – Get Out
Greta Gerwig – Lady Bird
Paul Thomas Anderson – Phantom Thread
Guillermo del Toro – The Shape of Water

Best visual effects

Blade Runner 2049
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Kong: Skull Island
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
War for the Planet of the Apes

 

Best makeup and hairstyling

Darkest Hour
Victoria and Abdul
Wonder

 

When Once was first released in cinemas ten years ago it was an unlikely contender to be a hit. Filmed on a shoestring budget, with scenes shot on Dublin’s streets without a permit and starring two non-actor in then-teenaged Markéra Irglová and the divisive Frames frontman Glen Hansard, John Carney’s film ended up making millions at the box-office, placing high on many critics’ end-of-year lists for the strong cinematic year of 2007 and winning the Best Original Song Academy Award for Falling Slowly. It’s a film that has been entered into the canon of Irish favourites, and a great choice to watch on a (hopefully) bright summer evening on a nice cosy blanket. So with that in mind, Happenings in association with 7Up have picked out Once to be the next film for their Open Air Cinema.

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A live-to-film celebration tour of La La Land has been announced, with the not-quite-Best Picture touring at concert halls in the United States, Mexico and Europe. The film will be coming to the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre with live musical accompaniment later this year.

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Director: Barry Jenkins Starring: Trevante Rhodes, Ashton Sanders, Alex Hibbert, Naomie Harris, Mahershali Ali, Janelle Monàe, André Holland, Jharrel Jerome Running Time: 111 minutes

On a beautiful Miami beach, a father figure speaks to the young boy he’s decided to take responsibilty for. It’s a safe, calm place away from the oppressive inner city. In the moonlight, Mahershala Ali’s paternal drug-peddler Juan says to the silent and sad young Little, black boys look blue. Which is to say, how they’re seen changes depending on the world around them, and isn’t necessarily reflective of the truth. These words and the way in which they’re spoken reveal much about Moonlight, a poetic film that explores many issues about identity both racial and sexual, but does so in a deeply intimate and personal way.

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Director: Jeff Nichols Starring: Ruth Negga, Joel Edgerton Running Time: 123 minutes


In 1958, white construction worker Richard Loving and his black partner Mildred Jeter travelled from their home of Caroline County, Virginia to get married in Washington D.C. Richard planned to build a house for his pregnant wife a stone’s throw from her family home, but their efforts to make an ordinary life together were obstructed by the very homeland they wish to do so in, as Virginia’s racist “anti-miscegenation” laws see the two arrested, humiliated and shamed, forced by court order to take their marriage out of state or face imprisonment. The Loving’s case against this ruling’s rise to the Supreme Court and the eventual overturning of the anti-miscegenation laws were landmark moments in the ongoing fight for Civil Rights in America, but in Loving, director  Jeff Nichols eschews righteous legal drama for a decidedly grounded focus on the marriage at the heart of the matter.Read more…

Director: Damien Chazelle Starring: Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone Running Time: 128 minutes


 

Having been subjected to months of hype and subsequently inevitable backlash, it has been almost impossible to go into La La Land without expectations being shaped one way or another. Is it truly the greatest thing since sliced bread, is it a musical for people who don’t like musicals, does it deserve the onslaught of accolades or is it merely the dreaded “Oscar Bait”, to be forgotten as soon as everyone files out of the Dolby Theatre on February 26th? That label and the associations that go with it, that La La Land is deliberately designed at every level to take home Academy Awards, are cynical accusations to make, but we live in cynical times. That is what makes La La Land such an appealing throwback, an abandonment of reality that shows its beautiful stars pursuing and achieving their dreams in the brightest light possible. There’s not much of our real world in struggling actress Mia’s massive apartment decked in classic film posters, or on the various, impossibly romantic dates she shares with jazz fanatic Sebastian. Reality is the antagonist of La La Land, right from the opening where dozens and dozens of motorists abandon an LA gridlock for a showstopping musical number, through Mia’s numerous, disastrous auditions and Seb’s jazz dogmatism setting him back over and over, reality is what the characters are trying to overcome to find happiness.

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