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We’re less than a week away from this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival and the anticipation is building quickly in the fair city of film. As the festival approaches, every day Film In Dublin will be counting down by highlighting one of the fascinating, fun and can’t miss events taking place during ADIFF 2018. Today, we highlight a public interview taking place on Saturday 3rd March with award-winning costume designer, Sandy Powell. Throughout a successful career in cinema, Powell has worked frequently with renowned directors including Martin Scorsese, Todd Haynes and Ireland’s own Neil Jordan. A twelve-time Oscar nominee, Powell has won the award on three occasions; for Shakespeare in Love, The Aviator and The Young Victoria.

 

Powell will be on hand during the festival to discuss her career, and with two films that that she has worked on featuring during ADIFF in Todd Haynes’ latest Wonderstruck the sci-fi rom-com How to Talk to Girls at Parties, there is sure to be a lot insight for ADIFF attendees. The host of the evening Eimer Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh is a considerable talent in costume design herself, with credits including Love and FriendshipThe Wind that Shakes the Barley and more.

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carolhttp://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carol

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To celebrate its 40th anniversary, Martin Scorsese’s classic 1976 film Taxi Driver returned to theatres for a limited run in the US last year. Starting this week, the restored film screens in Dublin, with several showings at the Light House Cinema and the IFI.

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Director: Martin Scorsese Starring: Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver, Yōsuke Kubozuka, Liam Neeson, Tadanobu Asano, Shinya Tsukamoto, Issey Ogata Running Time: 159 minutes


It will be interesting to see the Irish reception to Silence, a film about struggling with the Catholic faith that’s been mulling around in the head of Martin Scorsese for some 25 years. Though it’s oppression of the Church rather than by it that leads to the crisis of belief the Jesuit priests of the film encounter, their struggle will no doubt resonate with many viewers here. And in fairness, be of complete indifference to others. As a quiet and understated story of suffering, it’s a stylistic departure from recent bombastic displays from the veteran director, but hidden in the performances of its leads are similar themes of determined men and their (often self-aggrandising) efforts to succeed that have been consistent throughout his work. Suffering is all over this story, but when suffering is as glorified as is in Catholicism, at what point do the motivations of those who are suffering get called into question?

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