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Last November saw the first edition of the iffy Short Film Festival, a bite-sized selection of shorts for Liffey-side lovers of film. The festival will be making its return early next month, with another batch of movie bouches. A festival that embraces and celebrates the potential and power of the short film on its own merits, iffy will be returning for its 3rd edition in the coming weeks, with 9 films to be shown in total.

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It’s easy to be cynical when it comes to movies for kids, especially during the summer. A succession of safe, loud, obnoxious films are nearly always lined up for the school break months, lingering at the box office until well into September. Even the quality ones with craft and ambition put into them can feel like IP-introductory exercises, maintaining brand awareness in the first two quadrants into infinity and beyond. But be cynical no more! (Maybe get a bit of lunch in and lighten up…)

The IFI Family Film Festival, the Irish Film Institute’s annual event of cinema catered to young viewers, returns in July with a programme of international treats to entertain film fans of all ages, whatever the weather.

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Though we at Film In Dublin love a prestigious evening of sophisticated cinema as much as the next website, there’s no doubt that sometimes it’s good to kick back and enjoy a late night of wild and weird cult movies. And who says the latter can’t have as much artistic intrigue and worthy discussion as the latter? Cabaret Noise certainly agree with us on that front.  This new Dublin-based film events company are dedicated to bringing cinemas greatest and most forgotten oddities to all manner of venues and locations around Dublin, and they’ll be introducing themselves to the fair city of film with a series of oddities set to screen in Stoneybatter over the next few months.

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One of Ireland’s biggest film festivals every year, the Galway Film Fleadh begins next Tuesday 10th July, kicking off a week of fantastic films from at home and abroad. And though it doesn’t happen here in Dublin, we eagerly anticipate many of the festival’s films, not least of which includes Mother, the 2017 Galway Film Centre/RTÉ Short Film Commission. The short, starring The Young Offenders’ Hilary Rose and Lochlann O’Mearáin of Ros na Rú, developed from a script by Jonathan Hughes, directed by Natasha Waugh and produced by Sharon Cronin, has an eye-catching premise. It tells the story of Grace, a mother with an ideal happy family; a loving husband and two wonderful children. But when her husband arrives home one day with a brand new kitchen appliance, she slowly starts to realize that there might not be room for both of them at home. It’s a quirky comedy light on dialogue, with an intriguing dark streak. The project received just under €15,000 in funding as part of the commission, as well as the contribution’s of Script Editor Deirdre Roycroft and director Deabhla Walsh (Penny Dreadful, Fargo, The Punisher, Emmy Award winner for Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special, Little Dorrit) as mentors on the scheme. The short will premiere at the Fleadh next week, and ahead of the Mother‘s big day, we caught up with Natasha Waugh to discuss the production, the mentoring aspect of the GFC/RTE programme, and working with a very unique performer…

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As anyone who has seen The Shining will tell you, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. We’re pretty sure the moral of that particular story was to party hard and enjoy the summer outdoors after being cooped up all winter. This July, BrewDog are offering the opportunity to do just that, promising craft beer, classic movies and live music, at their Cinematic Circus.

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It’s a summer of 70mm at the Irish Film Institute, as they announced yesterday afternoon a trio of classics to be shown on film over the next three months. Beloved hits all, tickets for these 70mm films are sure to sell out fast. Screenings of films in this classic format have traditionally been a hit with the IFI crowd and following on from last year’s successful showings of films old and new like Lawrence of Arabia and Dunkirk, this format returns for a season in the sun.

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When Once was first released in cinemas ten years ago it was an unlikely contender to be a hit. Filmed on a shoestring budget, with scenes shot on Dublin’s streets without a permit and starring two non-actor in then-teenaged Markéra Irglová and the divisive Frames frontman Glen Hansard, John Carney’s film ended up making millions at the box-office, placing high on many critics’ end-of-year lists for the strong cinematic year of 2007 and winning the Best Original Song Academy Award for Falling Slowly. It’s a film that has been entered into the canon of Irish favourites, and a great choice to watch on a (hopefully) bright summer evening on a nice cosy blanket. So with that in mind, Happenings in association with 7Up have picked out Once to be the next film for their Open Air Cinema.

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It may be hard to believe now, but there was once a time when America was under the thumb of a brash lout with delusions of class, a man who rose to power and prominence despite his blatant criminality. Though there are certainly no modern day comparisons to Al Capone that spring immediately to mind, he remains a fascinating historical figure. As it happens, this summer marks the 30th anniversary of the classic film The Untouchables, Brian De Palma’s strongly-casted story about Eliot Ness and his team of Untouchables’ efforts to bring Capone down during Prohibition. Grindhouse Dublin have chosen to celebrate the film’s anniversary for their screening this month, showing it at the Light House Cinema on July 28th.

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