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Director: Thaddeus O’Sullivan Starring: Tom Vaughan-Lawlor Running Time: 81 minutes


In picking out names from late 19th-early 20th century Ireland, a time when as George Moore put it, “The sceptre of intelligence moved from London to Dublin”, art collector Hugh Lane may not be the first one that comes to mind. It may not come to mind at all if you’re not a major arts enthusiast. However, the innovative and very interesting Citizen Lane paints a vivid picture of the man as an enigmatic character from a period in Irish history packed full of fascinating figures. Look past the naff title, this unusual mix of documentary and narrative is likely to draw a high appraisal from those who view it.

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Young filmmakers Matthew Roche and Elliot Milofsky are putting out interesting short films at a fast pace, through their production company Extra Extra. Their latest short, Philomela is the story of a woman who experiences a break-in to her home and is forced to keep the intruder. Though Mela attempts to persuade the guards, her parents and others of the injustice, her words go unheard and the psychological toll on her hits hard. Blunt and stark, it nevertheless makes its point very clearly. It isn’t difficult to figure out the political subtext of Roche and Milofsky’s film, this week in particular. Film In Dublin spoke with Matthew Roche about the thinking behind the short.

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With just 10 days to go until the Referendum on the regulation of termination of pregnancy, it is a vital time to provide information that is honest, both factually and emotionally, to the public. One of a number in the Irish film community making efforts in this regard is Karl Callan, whose short film, simply titled  Repeal aims to tell the stories of women for whom the repealing of the 8th amendment is vital.

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For a number of years, Leitrim-based director Sean Clancy has built up his reputation, working on a number of music videos and short films, including the award-winning Cavalier. His first feature film, Locus of Control, tells the story of a struggling stand-up comedian Andrew Egan who is forced to take a teaching job helping the unemployed re-enter the workforce. As Andrew grows accustomed to the droll institution and its occupants he suspects that one of the students is out to get him and that the previous teacher may not have left of his own accord. His life slowly unravels and both Andrew’s lessons and stand-up gigs fall on deaf ears and he finds himself trapped in a larger cosmic joke. The film was shown last month as one of the Irish features at the Silk Road Film Festival, and this Thursday will be the opening feature of the second Dublin Sci-Fi Film Festival. Ahead of that screening of the film, written, directed and edited by Clancy, Film In Dublin caught up with the up and coming Irish director.

 

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It’s a good month for festivals in the fair city of film. With the East Asia Film Festival opening last night at the IFI and the Japanese Film Festival kicking off throughout the country this weekend, the time is perfect to get out of the April showers and into a cinema. Also this month is the return of the Dublin Sci-Fi Film Festival, and last night the festival held a launch party in the Generator Hostel in Smithfield. With the launch complete and the full schedule of films now announced, the second year of one of Dublin’s top film festivals is ready to get underway at the end of the month.

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The New Music is a film that looks at a little know medical condition, as well as the struggle to readjust your life when things don’t turn out the way you initially planned. The film tells the story of Adrian, a classical pianist with extraordinary talent, who discovers he has Young Onset Parkinson’s, a rare form of Parkinson’s Disease affecting sufferers under fifty. Despite this debilitating condition, Adrian joins a punk band as a keyboard player and rediscovers his life through music and love.

The shooting of the film has now concluded, with a crowd-funding campaign underway to ensure the film’s release and raise funds for Young Parkinson’s Ireland. Film In Dublin spoke with the film’s director Chiara Viale, as well as actor Cilléin McEvoy about the film and their efforts to see it released.

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Repeal is the story of 3 women and the difficulties they encounter in the face of abortions laws in Ireland. Released early next month, the short is inspired by real women’s testimonies of the difficulties they have faced as a consequence of the 8th amendment, and speaks to the importance of repealing the amendment when it goes to a referendum in May. A trailer for the short, directed by Karl Callan, is available now.

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This January, the first Dublin Smartphone Film Festival took place at the Generator Hostel in Smithfield, a weekend showcasing the possibilities of smartphone filmmaking. With experienced hands like Steven Soderbergh experimenting with the format, its prominence is only growing, but a new generation of directors are taking up their phones and the opportunities accessible tech is affording them to create films of their own. Two such emerging talents are Matthew Roche and Elliot Milofsky, independent Irish film-makers currently studying Philosophy in Dublin. As part of ‘Extra Extra’, the pair just finished their latest short film Lady Luck, a submission for the Moment Invitational Film Festival. Their last short film Far won “Best Irish Film” at the Dublin Smartphone Film Festival and even since then the pair have been directing more shorts, all completed only with a smartphone. Film In Dublin spoke with the pair about their efforts in filmmaking and in getting others to realise the potential of the phones in their pockets.

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