Follow Me

Close

Director: David Lowry Starring: Casey Affleck, Rooney Mara Runtime: 87 minutes


A Ghost Story plunges the depths of themes that most filmmakers have devoted their careers to exploring. The ambition and quiet confidence with which it delves into issues such as life, death, memory and time is, quite simply, something to be marvelled at and revered. While it may challenge some movie-goers, director David Lowry (Ain’t Them Bodies SaintsPete’s Dragon) has created a film that rewards those who are willing to listen and understand what it endeavours to explore: the enduring and resolute spirit of love in the face of significant loss. Make no mistake, A Ghost Story is 2017’s greatest film. Read more…

Director: Johannes Roberts Starring: Mandy Moore, Claire Holt, Matthew Modine Running Time: 85 minutes


People don’t want to think it’s safe to go back in the water. Jaws is a classic for a reason, but even getting away from that, movies like Open Water and last year’s hit The Shallows have made easy money by preying on audiences’ primal fear of the ocean and the black-beasts that lurk within. If you’ll forgive the phrasing, 47 Meters Down attempts to dive deeper into those fears, drawing its scares not just from its sharks but from threats like drowning, the bends, accidentally spear-gunning yourself and other nightmarish scenarios that arise when trapped on the ocean floor. A maniac chasing us through our dreams to kill us with knife-gloves and awful puns is impossible, but being eaten by a shark? Sure it’s a 1 in 264.1 million chance, but there’s still a chance, and it’s that fear that shark movies tap into to great effect. Unfortunately, while your chances of enjoying this film are a bit better than 1 in 264.1 million, it’s still a long way from a sure thing.

Read more…

Director: Trey Edward Shults Starring: Joel Edgerton, Christopher Abbott, Carmen Ejogo, Kelvin Harrison Jr., Riley Keough Running Time: 91 minutes


Shotguns getting cocked. Barking dogs. Barricaded houses. Cagey, distrustful men with southern accents. Fear of the dying and their blood and their viscera. Hiding infections. Arguments. Us or them. Shotguns getting shot.

It Comes at Night is not a film about zombies, but it’s undoubtedly a film that knows that its audience is familiar with zombie tropes, and that they can use them to follow the film’s path even as it obscures everything in darkness. When you’re as sick as the delirious, sore-covered grandfather who’s shown as this film opens, it’s immediately clear that a mercy kill is not too far away. When the environment is as tense and uncertain as what the audience sees here; a family of (recently) three hiding out in the woods after a contagious disease has ravaged the world, viewers know that almost always, human nature ends up being more dangerous than the literal threat. The last thing this equation needs is more people in it. So in, inevitably, they come.

Read more…

Happenings love of sharing cinema in the great outdoors has brought some great evenings to Dublin film fans in the past, including Sing Street and other Irish favourites around the county for this year’s St. Patrick’s Festival and last year’s Centenary Cinema events for the 1916 anniversary. The most recent edition of Happenings’ Open Air Cinema will offer a unique experience for cinephiles, as they’ll be showing a silent horror classic in Mount Merrion this Saturday.

Read more…

Director: Alex Kurtzman Starring: Tom Cruise, Sofia Boutella, Annabelle Wallis, Russell Crowe, Jake Johnson Running Time: 107 minutes


The scariest moment in The Mummy comes before its titular monster even shows up onscreen. After the Universal fanfare stops and their globe has faded from view, the title card of the “Dark Universe” appears on screen, signifying The Mummy’s status as the first entry in yet another interconnected series of blockbusters. The repurposing of Universal’s classic monster movies into identikit action flicks to be packaged off to the international market looks like a particularly desperate attempt from the studio to get a slice of Marvel’s pie, and that Dark Universe logo and its confirmation that they are going all in on this may not be the kind of fright to provoke nightmares, but it certainly might lead to a few headaches before going to bed.

Read more…

Directed By: Lorcan Finnegan  Starring: Alan McKenna, Niamh Algar, James Browne  Running Time: 93 minutes


Without Name is the first feature length film from Lorcan Finnegan and writer Garret Shanley, the same team behind the short Foxes. The film celebrates ancient Irish folklore, returning it to its dark roots of mischievous fairy folk. The use of this mythology suits the eco-horror themes perfectly. We all know to steer clear of fairy rings and where the wrong places to be after dark are out in the country side. Without Name plays well on Irish superstitions.

Read more…

Director: Anna Biller  Starring: Samantha Robinson, Jeffrey Vincent Parise, Laura Waddell  Running Time: 120 minutes


Anna Biller’s much anticipated dreamy technicolour feature came to Dublin as part of ADIFF 2017. The Love Witch is a true love letter to the pulp novels and films of the 1960s, full of beautiful women led astray to do bad things. Our witch, Elaine, is just a lovesick lady looking for a man to please. Sometimes to death.

Read more…

Women in Horror Month is an international, grassroots initiative, which encourages supporters to learn about and showcase the underrepresented work of women in the horror industries. Whether they are on the screen, behind the scenes, or contributing in their other various artistic ways, it is clear that women love, appreciate, and contribute to the horror genre. Now in its 8th year, Women in Horror Month provides representation to those women, actively promoting do-it-yourself annual film screenings, blogs/articles, podcasts, and other forms of creative media with the goal of helping works by and featuring women reach a wider audience worldwide. Last year saw the first WiHM event to be held in Dublin and this Sunday, the Liquor Rooms on Wellington Quay will host the event for the first time.

Read more…

Director: Colm McCarthy Starring: Gemma Arterton, Paddy Considine, Glenn Close, and Sennia Nanua Run Time: 111mins


In a time when zombie stories feel like they’ve been done to death on both the large and small screen, one can’t help but wonder if the genre has anything fresh or compelling left to offer.  As it turns out, it has;  The Girl With All the Gifts is perhaps the best zombie related movie since 28 Days Later reinvented the genre back in 2002. And although it owes a large debt to that film’s setting, general aesthetic, and “rage fueled” undead, it manages to inject plenty of new life and ideas into the mix.Read more…

Director: Adam Wingard Starring: Callie Hernandez, James Allen McCune Running Time: 89 minutes


In 1999, The Blair Witch Project was released amidst a massive wave of hype, propelled by early attempts at viral marketing and a ‘based on a true story’ flimflam that caught viewers offguard. With more story around the film than in it and a loose structure much closer to actual found footage than the genre staple tends to be today, it really was a project, a different kind of horror than audiences had seen before. However, audiences often don’t want different and the backlash was swift and the rushed and disastrous sequel Book of Shadows did little to help. Nearly two decades later, new sequel Blair Witch has flown in deliberately under the radar, filmed under the misdirect title The WoodsBlair Witch frequently feels like the kind of film viewers thought the original was offering, which should satisfy some but those who were happy with what they got first time around might leave disappointed.

Read more…