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Director: George Clooney Starring: Matt Damon, Julianne Moore, Oscar Isaac, Noah Jupe Runtime: 105 minutes

Amongst the white picket fences and pristinely mowed lawns of 1950’s American suburbia, director George Clooney sets the scene for his new comedy noir, Suburbicon. Originally penned (and subsequently shelved) by the Coen Brothers in 1986, the movie found new life in the hands of Clooney and long-time writing partner Grant Heslov. After years on the shelf, the film has finally reached our screens with the same wicked sense of humour we have come to expect from the Coen Brothers throughout the years. Just like the titular town itself, there are a few cracks in the foundation of Suburbicon but not nearly enough to sink what is a watchable, surreal and funny film.

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Journalists. Intrepid crusaders for truth and justice, or cynical slingers of sensationalism and the now-dreaded ‘fake news’? It might be some combination of the two (except of course for self-appointed film critics, whose dedication and value are without question), but the world of journalism has always been of interest to filmmakers, with its capacity for high stakes, morality plays and occasionally, a quickly-escalating news team brawl. All through September into early October, the Light House Cinema will be screening an extensive selection of great films about journalists, news anchors, newspaper men and more in the media, with classics both cult and canonised from some of the biggest names in Western filmmaking. Exploring journalism in all its forms, ‘Hacks’ season is here and we have the full schedule for you to peruse.Read more…

The urge is understandable to avoid a retrospective of the year 2016. Not since Lot’s wife decided to take a cheeky glance back at Sodom has looking back at something been more likely to produce misery and misfortune the way this year has, but that only makes it all the more important to go back over the few bright spots, particularly for movie lovers. 2016 was undoubtedly a great year for Irish cinema, with 9 Oscar nominations and two wins, Irish films showing prominently in festivals around the globe, major stars and filmmakers coming to film on the island and some eye-catching box office success. Of course, 2016 is a year that will always stand out to the writers at Film In Dublin, as this was the year that the site launched and since mid-July we’ve worked hard to show you the positives and the pitfalls of navigating through the fair city of cinema.

With the year almost over, our writers have compiled a list of some of this year’s cinematic highlights. Balloting every member for their own top picks of the year, a consensus was more or less reached on ten outstanding films, cinema that provided a welcome distraction from the horrors of the last twelve months, helped sharpen our focus from the lessons to be learned from the year, or both. We’re sure to have left out some of your favourites; in keeping the list to the very best of the best we’ve had to omit some of our own best loved choices so we’re more than open to suggestions on what else could have been considered. Here though, are Film In Dublin’s picks for the top 10 films of 2016.Read more…

Directors: Joel and Ethan Coen Starring: Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Alden Ehenreich Running Time: 106 minutes

There are moments in Hail, Caesar! where it really feels like the Coen Brothers have put together their greatest comedy ever, a broad and absurd send up of Old Hollywood filled with classic cinema references and thinly-veiled analogues that brings all the age’s greatest fears of decadent miscreants and godless Communists to bear, a non-stop circus that needs some sense slapped into it by studio fixer Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin) But while Hail, Caesar! is always beautiful to look at and often hilarious to listen to, the day in the life of Mannix we see in the film has too much going on to add up to a satisfying conclusion, or even the unsatisfying conclusions typically favoured by the filmmakers.

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