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This summer marks the ten year anniversary of one of the most influential blockbusters of all time, The Dark Knight. You may have seen a thinkpiece or two on your timelines over the last few days contemplating the legacy of the seminal entry to Christopher Nolan’s trilogy of billionaire bat versus systemic crime, but if you’d like to see the film on the screen and make up your mind for yourself how well it holds up, the Light House Cinema has you covered.

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The nominations for the 90th edition of the Academy Awards have now been announced. Tiffany Haddish and Andy Serkis announced the nominees for the 2018 Academy Awards live from the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in the morning in the US, with Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, expected to be among the front-runners in the race for Best Picture. Guillhermo Del Toro’s The Shape of Water led the way in the number of nominations, with 13. Greta Gerwig became the first woman to be nominated for Best Director since Katheryn Bigelow in 2009, while Jordan Peele was nominated in the same category for Get Out. Saoirse Ronan received her latest award nomination in the Best Actress category (her third Oscar nomination), while The Breadwinner, made by Irish animation studio Cartoon Saloon, was among the nominees for best animated feature. Daniel Day-Lewis, in what is reported to be his final acting role, received a nomination for Best Actor for his performance in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread. Irish costume designer Consolata Boyle also received the third nomination of her career, for her work on Victoria and Abdul.

This year’s ceremony, to be hosted by Jimmy Kimmell, will take place the 4th of March. See the full list of nominations below:

Best picture

 

Call Me By Your Name
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Post
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best cinematography

Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

 

Best supporting actor

Willem Dafoe – The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins – The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer – All the Money in the World
Sam Rockwell – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best documentary

Faces Places
Icarus
Last Men in Aleppo
Strong Island

Best foreign language film

A Fantastic Woman (Chile)
On Body and Soul (Hungary)
The Insult  (Lebanon)
Loveless  (Russia)
The Square (Sweden)

Best actor

Timothée Chalamet – Call Me by Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis – Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya – Get Out
Gary Oldman – Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington – Roman J. Israel, Esq

Best costume design

Beauty and the Beast
Darkest Hour
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Victoria and Abdul

Best score

Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

 

Best song

Remember Me (from Coco)
Mystery of Love (from Call Me By Your Name)
This Is Me (from The Greatest Showman)
Mighty River (from Mudbound)
Stand Up For Something (from Marshall)

Best sound editing

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best sound mixing

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

 

Best documentary short

Edith & Eddie
Heaven is a Traffic Jam
Heroin(e)

Knifeskills
Traffic Stop

Best production design

Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water

 

Best original screenplay

The Big Sick
Get Out
Lady Bird
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best adapted screenplay

Call Me By Your Name
The Disaster Artist
Logan
Molly’s Game
Mudbound

Best animated feature

The Boss Baby

The Breadwinner

Coco

Ferdinand

Loving Vincent

Best animated short

Dear Basketball
Garden Party
Lou
Negative Space
Revolting Rhymes

Best live-action short

Dekalb Elementary
The 11 O’Clock
My Nephew Emmett
The Silent Child
All Of Us

 

Best supporting actress

Mary J. Blige – Mudbound
Allison Janney – I, Tonya
Leslie Manville – Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf – Lady Bird
Octavia Spencer – The Shape of Water

Best film editing

Baby Driver
Dunkirk
I, Tonya
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best actress

Sally Hawkins – The Shape of Water
Frances McDormand – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie – I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird
Meryl Streep – The Post

Best director

Christopher Nolan – Dunkirk
Jordan Peele – Get Out
Greta Gerwig – Lady Bird
Paul Thomas Anderson – Phantom Thread
Guillermo del Toro – The Shape of Water

Best visual effects

Blade Runner 2049
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Kong: Skull Island
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
War for the Planet of the Apes

 

Best makeup and hairstyling

Darkest Hour
Victoria and Abdul
Wonder

 

Director: Joe Wright Starring: Gary Oldman, Kristen Scott Thomas, Lily James, Ben Mendelsohn, Stephen Dillane Running Time: 125 minutes


When the Bard gets boring, it’s increasingly appealing to distinguished actors to turn to Winston Churchill for their monologue jollies; “we shall fight them on the beaches” being as suitable for performance as anything Shakespeare ever did. Through various films, such noteworthy performers as Albert Finney, our own Brendan Gleeson, Brian Cox last year and um…Christian Slater, have donned the bowler hat, stuck up a V-sign and gotten down to speechifying, and now Gary Oldman picks up that mantle. Unrecognisable in impressive make up, Oldman’s turn in Darkest Hour is being put forth as a showcase for the veteran, a big Oscar-grabbing performance in a film that looks, as many do, back at Britain’s ‘darkest hour’ also in some ways as its finest. Let’s not forget, there was literally a film about this exact same time-period titled Their Finest released just last year. Rarely, if ever, do films of this type want to engage with Churchill the racist, the Churchill that sent soldiers into Tonypandy or helped starve India, or set up the Black and Tans and Darkest Hour is no exception, an effort to rouse and court applause and though it’s definitely well-made enough to receive that in some quarters, the film and Oldman’s central performance are both at their best when they tone down the bombast and openly admit just how close Britain came to ruin.

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From October 27-30th, Dublin City will be host once again to the Bram Stoker Festival, a gothically inspired season of events celebrating the work of one of Ireland’s most prominent authors and the mind that gave rise to Dracula. From dance to parades to live performances, there’s plenty going on for vampire enthusiasts, but if you’re batty about film like we are (sorry, sorry), then you’ll want to be in attendance at the films that will be shown as part of Bram Stoker Festival 2017 .

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Director: Patrick Hughes Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Samuel L. Jackson, Selma Hayek, Gary Oldman Running Time: 118 minutes


Movies won’t appreciate what they have in Samuel L. Jackson until he’s gone. Not the highest highs, the Djangos, but the long, long list of unmemorable, mediocre or outright awful productions that have been raised one bar higher by the sheer presence of Jackson and the level and legitimacy he brings to every performance. The Hitman’s Bodyguard is a better film than many of those, but it’s many rougher edges are a lot easier to look past when Jackson is cackling hard at the latest inconvenience he’s caused Ryan Reynolds, the titular bodyguard to his titular hitman. Recalling many of the dumb but cheerful odd couple action movies of the 1980, here the at-odds pair’s chemistry is just strong enough to prop up a deeply misguided plot international intrigue, which aims to be something like a comedic episode of 24 but is more like an episode of Chuck if they were allowed to say motherfucker.

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In celebration of Bram Stoker Festival, we here at Film In Dublin decided to conjure up a list of the 4 most quintessential Dracula films, from the 1920s through to more recent depictions.

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