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Dublin Feminist Film Festival promotes and celebrates female filmmakers, dedicated to inspiring women of all kinds to become involved with filmmaking. The films showcased over the years at the festival have highlighted not just women on-screen, but also behind the camera, and stand as Dublin’s most prominent celebration of female filmmaking. This November, the Dublin Feminist Film Festival 2018 will continue this tradition of displaying women as women as compelling characters and creatives.

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The theme for Feminist Film Festival Dublin 2016 was ‘Othered Voices’, exploring both literal and figurative female voices in film. Margarita With A Straw allows Laila, a zesty young woman who struggles with how others perceive her cerebral palsy, to find self-acceptance. The film was directed by Shonali Bose who based the story on both her cousin and aspects of her own coming-of-age, and this personal touch shines throughout.

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After tape traders in Nigeria decided to start shooting their own movies on (relatively cheap) videotape to keep their store shelves full, the output of the Nigerian film industry exploded. ‘Nollywood’ as it has been called is now second only to India in the number of films it puts out every year, ahead of even Hollywood, which simple can’t reboot Spider-Man often enough to match the amount of films Nigeria puts out every year. For Westerners, the volume of ‘Nollywood’ is one of the only things known about it, and as the industry continues to develop in Nigeria, it will be worth observing trends there and how they compare and contrast with those of America, or of our own film industry. The closing film of last weekend’s Feminist Film Festival Dublin, short documentary Amaka’s Kin: The Women of Nollywood provides one inportant perspective of Nigerian cinema, focusing on women working behind the camera in one of the world’s biggest hubs of film.

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