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It’s a little bit chilly out there as we step into December, isn’t it? For those dreaming of sand and surf rather than snow and…sludge, the Irish Film Institute will be hosting a trio of documentaries this weekend about surfing, in Ireland and abroad. They’ll be looking at the Mavericks who live among the waves in these interesting docs, including previous successes screened at the IFI this year as well as a new Irish premiere.

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Director: Dawn Porter Running Time: 81 minutes


The theme of the 2017 Dublin Feminist Film Festival is ‘FeministFutures’, films that ask questions about future generations of women, not just related to science and technology, but also on the challenges facing women moving forward and subjects worth considering as things change for women in Ireland and elsewhere. The 2016 documentary Trapped makes for an excellent choice for an opener to the festival in this regard, depicting an urgent reality for women in the United States that has only continued in importance in the face of the considerable political changes in that country since the film’s release. For viewers in Ireland, the film makes for vital viewing as well, delivering the important message that no matter what happens next year with regards to repealing the 8th Amendment, the job of fighting for reproductive rights for women won’t be finished. Those who look to control and restrict the bodily rights of women will not go away.

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The latest film by Alex Gibney is set for release in Irish and UK cinemas on the 10th of November. The documentary director has courted both awards and controversy for films like Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief and We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks will be exploring the Troubles in his film No Stone Unturned.

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Last year saw the Dublin Worker’s Film Festival join the ranks of the many film festivals taking place in Dublin that bring a varied selection of films of diverse and meaningful subject matter to audiences in the nation’s capital. Taking place on Pearse Street, the festival screened three films from the 60s, 80s, and 2010s that addressed issues of the working classes, and this year the festival expands, with a programme of 6 films this October. Whether you get up early enough in the morning for our Taoiseach’s liking we couldn’t possibly say, but you won’t have to be up at the crack of dawn for these films, which span just about 100 years and include some interesting sounding Q and As to boot.

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The Dublin Doc Fest was founded by Tess Motherway in 2013 and since then, the festival has showcased short documentary films from both Irish and international filmmakers. Half a decade in to highlighting eye-opening documentaries in its carefully curated programmes, Dublin Doc Fest 2017 has now announced its selection of films for this year’s edition, with 14 films representing 8 countries for 1 night of provocative, non-fiction cinema.

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One of the flagship festivals and highlights in the calendar of the Irish Film Institute, the IFI Documentary Festival begins tomorrow, running over the weekend into the beginning of October. The festival will showcase fine documentary filmmaking from directors, Irish directors alongside international ones, for a programme of 16 feature length documentaries, 7 Irish premieres, as well as a world premiere.

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The community’s of Kilmainham and Inchicore are coming together this August for a festival that showcases the talents of local people and encourages all to enjoy local resources and take pride in the community. The Kilmainham-Inchicore Community Festival is a collaborative effort between the Kilmainham Arts Festival and Inchicore-based groups, who have joined forces to offer a wide variety of events on from August 24 – 27 including: a group art exhibition, a powerful one-man play, an exciting spoken word event, music, children’s activities and, most eye-catchingly to us, film screenings of documentaries made by local filmmakers. The events at the festival including these documentary screenings are all free and it looks like there’s plenty on offer for visitors to have a good time and bond with the local community.

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Director: Emer Reynolds ‘Starring’: Voyager 1, Voyager 2 Running Time: 121 minutes


While the primary goal of a documentary is to be informative, the best ones always distinguish themselves by being visually interesting. They are after all, still movies, not lectures and the best cases for filmed documentary are made by taking advantage of the medium and providing images that remain in the mind where facts and figures can find it easier to break free. In Irish director Emer Reynold’s space-faring doc The Farthest, a combination of interviews, well-selected archive footage and photographs and impressive computer-generated imagery come together to tell the story of the NASA’s Voyager mission in a truly beautiful fashion. It’s easy to feel the awe of space exploration when it looks as good as this.

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Set to take place in 2018, the Dublin Smartphone Film Festival is Ireland’s latest international film festival dedicated to filmmakers exclusively using mobile devices. The festival will screen a host of short film, documentary, animation and music videos, with industry and educational workshops as well as a few surprises.

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Director: Laura McGann StarringChristopher ‘Violent Bob’ Goggins, Rhona ‘Crow Jane’ Flynn Running Time: 86 minutes


Revolutions isn’t just a documentary about the sport of roller derby in Ireland, it goes so much deeper. It serves as a snapshot into the lives of young, ambitious people struggling to find a way through the recession in Ireland too. McGann spent 6 years filming the ups and downs of the (then) two Irish roller derby teams and their fearless spirit.

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