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This International Women’s Day, a number of cinemas will be celebrating Hollywood icon Hedy Lamarr by screening the new documentary Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story on Friday, 8th March.

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The nominations for the 90th edition of the Academy Awards have now been announced. Tiffany Haddish and Andy Serkis announced the nominees for the 2018 Academy Awards live from the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in the morning in the US, with Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, expected to be among the front-runners in the race for Best Picture. Guillhermo Del Toro’s The Shape of Water led the way in the number of nominations, with 13. Greta Gerwig became the first woman to be nominated for Best Director since Katheryn Bigelow in 2009, while Jordan Peele was nominated in the same category for Get Out. Saoirse Ronan received her latest award nomination in the Best Actress category (her third Oscar nomination), while The Breadwinner, made by Irish animation studio Cartoon Saloon, was among the nominees for best animated feature. Daniel Day-Lewis, in what is reported to be his final acting role, received a nomination for Best Actor for his performance in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread. Irish costume designer Consolata Boyle also received the third nomination of her career, for her work on Victoria and Abdul.

This year’s ceremony, to be hosted by Jimmy Kimmell, will take place the 4th of March. See the full list of nominations below:

Best picture

 

Call Me By Your Name
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Post
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best cinematography

Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

 

Best supporting actor

Willem Dafoe – The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins – The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer – All the Money in the World
Sam Rockwell – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best documentary

Faces Places
Icarus
Last Men in Aleppo
Strong Island

Best foreign language film

A Fantastic Woman (Chile)
On Body and Soul (Hungary)
The Insult  (Lebanon)
Loveless  (Russia)
The Square (Sweden)

Best actor

Timothée Chalamet – Call Me by Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis – Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya – Get Out
Gary Oldman – Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington – Roman J. Israel, Esq

Best costume design

Beauty and the Beast
Darkest Hour
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Victoria and Abdul

Best score

Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

 

Best song

Remember Me (from Coco)
Mystery of Love (from Call Me By Your Name)
This Is Me (from The Greatest Showman)
Mighty River (from Mudbound)
Stand Up For Something (from Marshall)

Best sound editing

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best sound mixing

Baby Driver
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water
Star Wars: The Last Jedi

 

Best documentary short

Edith & Eddie
Heaven is a Traffic Jam
Heroin(e)

Knifeskills
Traffic Stop

Best production design

Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049
Darkest Hour
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water

 

Best original screenplay

The Big Sick
Get Out
Lady Bird
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best adapted screenplay

Call Me By Your Name
The Disaster Artist
Logan
Molly’s Game
Mudbound

Best animated feature

The Boss Baby

The Breadwinner

Coco

Ferdinand

Loving Vincent

Best animated short

Dear Basketball
Garden Party
Lou
Negative Space
Revolting Rhymes

Best live-action short

Dekalb Elementary
The 11 O’Clock
My Nephew Emmett
The Silent Child
All Of Us

 

Best supporting actress

Mary J. Blige – Mudbound
Allison Janney – I, Tonya
Leslie Manville – Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf – Lady Bird
Octavia Spencer – The Shape of Water

Best film editing

Baby Driver
Dunkirk
I, Tonya
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best actress

Sally Hawkins – The Shape of Water
Frances McDormand – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie – I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird
Meryl Streep – The Post

Best director

Christopher Nolan – Dunkirk
Jordan Peele – Get Out
Greta Gerwig – Lady Bird
Paul Thomas Anderson – Phantom Thread
Guillermo del Toro – The Shape of Water

Best visual effects

Blade Runner 2049
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Kong: Skull Island
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
War for the Planet of the Apes

 

Best makeup and hairstyling

Darkest Hour
Victoria and Abdul
Wonder

 

In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.


Ross McDonnell is both a photographer and filmmaker, with credits in photography, cinematography and directing on several documentary films. Born in Dublin, Ireland in 1979. As a photographer, his work has been published in The New York Times, Art in America, The Observer, The Washington Post, The Irish Times, Fader magazine and more. A twp-time nominee for Irish Film and Television Awards, his films have screened at festivals around the world, including last year’s Elián, an official selection at the Tribeca Film Festival. A frequent collaborator with Alex Gibney, McDonnell worked on the director’s most recent film, No Stone Unturned – a documentary about a flare up of the violence of the Troubles in Co. Down in 1994, released last November.

 

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It has been a year. In 2017 there was a lot for film fans to contemplate, but in what they say on the screen and in the wider film business. Month after month, entertaining, challenging and interesting films found their way onto Irish screens, either from Hollywood or any number of our own talented Irish directors. It was a year where the sickeningly pervasive culture of abuse in cinema was thrust into the headlines by brave survivors no longer willing to suffer in silence. It was also a year in great filmmaking, where talented, diverse directors were given the opportunity to show their talent, several for the first time, where performances transported us just as believably to the far-off future, the underprivileged, overlooked present and even outside the fluid realm of time altogether. This is Film In Dublin’s list of the best films of 2017, the films that moved us, entertained us, opened our eyes and otherwise expressed everything that cinema is meant to be, in a year that showed that cinema doesn’t always achieve those lofty ideals behind the scenes.

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It’s a little bit chilly out there as we step into December, isn’t it? For those dreaming of sand and surf rather than snow and…sludge, the Irish Film Institute will be hosting a trio of documentaries this weekend about surfing, in Ireland and abroad. They’ll be looking at the Mavericks who live among the waves in these interesting docs, including previous successes screened at the IFI this year as well as a new Irish premiere.

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Director: Dawn Porter Running Time: 81 minutes


The theme of the 2017 Dublin Feminist Film Festival is ‘FeministFutures’, films that ask questions about future generations of women, not just related to science and technology, but also on the challenges facing women moving forward and subjects worth considering as things change for women in Ireland and elsewhere. The 2016 documentary Trapped makes for an excellent choice for an opener to the festival in this regard, depicting an urgent reality for women in the United States that has only continued in importance in the face of the considerable political changes in that country since the film’s release. For viewers in Ireland, the film makes for vital viewing as well, delivering the important message that no matter what happens next year with regards to repealing the 8th Amendment, the job of fighting for reproductive rights for women won’t be finished. Those who look to control and restrict the bodily rights of women will not go away.

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The latest film by Alex Gibney is set for release in Irish and UK cinemas on the 10th of November. The documentary director has courted both awards and controversy for films like Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief and We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks will be exploring the Troubles in his film No Stone Unturned.

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Last year saw the Dublin Worker’s Film Festival join the ranks of the many film festivals taking place in Dublin that bring a varied selection of films of diverse and meaningful subject matter to audiences in the nation’s capital. Taking place on Pearse Street, the festival screened three films from the 60s, 80s, and 2010s that addressed issues of the working classes, and this year the festival expands, with a programme of 6 films this October. Whether you get up early enough in the morning for our Taoiseach’s liking we couldn’t possibly say, but you won’t have to be up at the crack of dawn for these films, which span just about 100 years and include some interesting sounding Q and As to boot.

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The Dublin Doc Fest was founded by Tess Motherway in 2013 and since then, the festival has showcased short documentary films from both Irish and international filmmakers. Half a decade in to highlighting eye-opening documentaries in its carefully curated programmes, Dublin Doc Fest 2017 has now announced its selection of films for this year’s edition, with 14 films representing 8 countries for 1 night of provocative, non-fiction cinema.

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