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Two legends of cinema are being celebrated throughout June and the start of July at the Light House Cinema as their programme Hepburn Forever screens the work of Audrey and Katharine Hepburn. Two true icons of 20th century Hollywood, the films of the (non-related) Hepburns will be sure to bring a touch of glitz and glamour to the Smithfield cinema, making for one classy way to kick off the summer.

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Like us, you may have become addicted to Mad Max: Fury Road, the visually stunning, brilliantly chaotic action movie that stands as the best of its genre this decade. Perhaps it took hold of you and you resent its absence. Well resent no more, as Fury Road will return to the big screen at the end of April at the Light House Cinema, shiny and chrome. And black.

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Director: Damien Chazelle Starring: Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone Running Time: 128 minutes


 

Having been subjected to months of hype and subsequently inevitable backlash, it has been almost impossible to go into La La Land without expectations being shaped one way or another. Is it truly the greatest thing since sliced bread, is it a musical for people who don’t like musicals, does it deserve the onslaught of accolades or is it merely the dreaded “Oscar Bait”, to be forgotten as soon as everyone files out of the Dolby Theatre on February 26th? That label and the associations that go with it, that La La Land is deliberately designed at every level to take home Academy Awards, are cynical accusations to make, but we live in cynical times. That is what makes La La Land such an appealing throwback, an abandonment of reality that shows its beautiful stars pursuing and achieving their dreams in the brightest light possible. There’s not much of our real world in struggling actress Mia’s massive apartment decked in classic film posters, or on the various, impossibly romantic dates she shares with jazz fanatic Sebastian. Reality is the antagonist of La La Land, right from the opening where dozens and dozens of motorists abandon an LA gridlock for a showstopping musical number, through Mia’s numerous, disastrous auditions and Seb’s jazz dogmatism setting him back over and over, reality is what the characters are trying to overcome to find happiness.

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Christmas feels so long ago it may as well have never happened. Our New Year’s Resolutions are in tatters already and it’s only the 10th. Forget April, everybody knows that January is the cruellest month, but luckily the Sugar Club have a beacon of light to offer in these dark times. Popcorn have been screening classic films for fans to enjoy with a slice of pizza and perhaps a tall glass of water or two for a while now, and their streak is continuing in January with three films that may help chase your January Blues away.

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Since their inception in 2011, Film Fatale have been bringing classic Hollywood glamour to life. In screening old favourites and hosting parties filled with folks dressed to the nines, dancing to the old standards after a cocktail or two, they’ve allowed audiences a window back into the Golden Age of Hollywood. To celebrate their sixth birthday, Film Fatale will be hosting another event in one of Dublin’s most unique locations, showing one of the greatest films of all time just for good measure.

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The second Dublin Bowie Festival will take place citywide this January, beginning on Thursday 5th of January and continuing until Tuesday the 10th, the one year anniversary of David Bowie’s death. With last year’s festival happening to coincide with that event, interest was naturally high and the festival is already expanding considerably, with a programme of live music, Q&A panels and more, celebrating the impact that David Bowie had on art and pop culture. Included in that, of course, is a look at the musician’s work in film, with the Light House Cinema set to host a number of screenings of Bowie-related cinema in January 2017.

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“Have you got Soul Brother”? It has been 25 years since Alan Parker’s The Commitments appeared on our cinema screens and charmed its way into our hearts. Comprised of unknown performers and set in working class Ireland, this adaptation of one of Roddy Doyle’s most famous works captured the brutal economic hardships of a post-recession Dublin but also the zest and exuberance of what it was like to be young and have a dream.

In 1991, Ireland had the youngest population in Europe and some of the highest unemployment. The Commitments depicted a gritty working class Dublin that up until this time was absent in Irish cinema. A lot has changed in the 25 years since the film’s initial release.  Now a hugely successful West End Musical, the show has recently enjoyed several sell out shows here in Dublin. What better time for Film in Dublin to break down this Irish classic and see if it still has soul after all these years?

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Sri Lankan-born artist Paul Weerasekera has been living in Ireland for 25 years and recently moved to Dublin having spent most of that time in Limerick. Trained as an architect, Weerasekera also studied art and design in the UK, before making his way over here, and the artist currently teaches in both Limerick and Dublin.  His most recent series of paintings, ‘CINEMA’, transports famous movie characters onto canvas and has been on display at Filmbase as part of Dub Web Fest. The exhibition ends with the festival tomorrow, but all of the paintings from this exhibition remain available for purchase, with proceeds aiding the Irish Cancer Society. From old Hollywood icons like John Wayne to Christopher Nolan’s take on Batman, Paul Weerasekera’s paintings cover a wide range of Hollywood history. We have a gallery after the jump with just some of the paintings that make up the ‘CINEMA’ exhibition.

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The current incarnation of HBO’S Westworld series is now on the eve of its fourth episode and enjoying universal critical approval. Mixing thought-provoking science fiction with disturbing horror, the show poses a number of ethical and social questions about socialites rapid adoption and integration with technology. Where do we draw the line between artificial life and human life? Is it murder or infidelity if none of it is real? These are poignant questions in 2016 and the show could not have arrived at a better time to explore these themes. To get a better understanding of this new incarnation we here at Film in Dublin have decided to revisit the Cult 1973 original. Released incidentally only 2 days after the opening of Disney World Florida, Westworld posits a future where rich tourists can enjoy luxury vacations in a state of the art adult theme park, their every needs served by lifelike robots. The vacation becomes a nightmare when the androids start malfunctioning and killing the guests. 43 years after its release, this low budget SCI-FI now seems sharply relevant. It is a cautionary tale of man’s inability to see its own fallibility in the pursuit of innovation.

 

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For many people, the minute August ends is officially the start of Halloween season, with pumpkin spice and all things spooky popping up instantly. Those early starters will want to save Saturday October 29th as soon as possible, as that night the National Concert Hall is presenting one of the all-time great horror films, the 1931 version of Dracula, starring the great Bela Lugosi.

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