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A Masterclass in directing comes to the Brooks Hotel on Drury Street next Monday, courtesy if the Women in Film and Television Ireland and the director Aisling Walsh. Following her latest film Maudie‘s showings at the Toronto Film Festival and ADIFF 2017, Walsh will be talking about directing and writing for the screen from 6-9pm next Monday, 29 May.

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Directed By: Lorcan Finnegan  Starring: Alan McKenna, Niamh Algar, James Browne  Running Time: 93 minutes


Without Name is the first feature length film from Lorcan Finnegan and writer Garret Shanley, the same team behind the short Foxes. The film celebrates ancient Irish folklore, returning it to its dark roots of mischievous fairy folk. The use of this mythology suits the eco-horror themes perfectly. We all know to steer clear of fairy rings and where the wrong places to be after dark are out in the country side. Without Name plays well on Irish superstitions.

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Director: Alan Gilsenan Starring: Catherine Keener, Hannah Gross Running Time: 90 minutes


Adapting the Canadian Author Carol Shields final novel Unless for the big screen was certainly going to be a challenge. The novel, the last book written by the author before her passing from breast cancer, was a sprawling story with many layers of philosophical meditation. The novel tackles gender inequality and the realistic possibilities for women, the nature of happiness as well as identification of people’s place and purpose in time. Writer/director Alan Gilsenan does a noble job of condensing these themes into a digestible cinematic format and with Catherine Keeners raw, realistic central performance Unless feels like a film with a lot on its mind. The resulting film however is never as nuanced and profound as it thinks it is, keeping the audience at an emotional distance when it should be letting them in.

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Director: Raoul Peck Narrated By: Samuel L. Jackson Running Time: 95 minutes


“The story of the negro in America is the story of America” is the central message of I Am Not Your Negro, the kind of message white people in the United States have always been determined to ignore. As directed by the activist Raoul Peck, the words of the writer and social critic James Baldwin are as difficult to ignore as possible, simply but firmly putting the black people of the United States in the forefront of the nation’s history where they belong.

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