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Director: Patrick Hughes Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Samuel L. Jackson, Selma Hayek, Gary Oldman Running Time: 118 minutes


Movies won’t appreciate what they have in Samuel L. Jackson until he’s gone. Not the highest highs, the Djangos, but the long, long list of unmemorable, mediocre or outright awful productions that have been raised one bar higher by the sheer presence of Jackson and the level and legitimacy he brings to every performance. The Hitman’s Bodyguard is a better film than many of those, but it’s many rougher edges are a lot easier to look past when Jackson is cackling hard at the latest inconvenience he’s caused Ryan Reynolds, the titular bodyguard to his titular hitman. Recalling many of the dumb but cheerful odd couple action movies of the 1980, here the at-odds pair’s chemistry is just strong enough to prop up a deeply misguided plot international intrigue, which aims to be something like a comedic episode of 24 but is more like an episode of Chuck if they were allowed to say motherfucker.

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Director: Ben Wheatley Starring: Cillian Murphy, Sharlto Copley, Brie Larson, Jack Reynor, Michael Smiley Running Time: 90 minutes


A high stakes deal between criminals. Clashes of personality, honour among thieves. A job that goes souther than south. And lots and lots of gun fire. If Free Fire was actually made during the decade in which it’s set, the 1970s, then it’s not hard to imagine its ultra-macho story being played considerably more straightfaced. Ben Wheatley and co-writer and co-editor Amy Jump on the other hand, choose to draw out the crime drama tropes to a near-breaking point, not past the point of absurdity but stopping just shy of it, resulting in a madcap action comedy that winds up its entertainingly clashing cast and then sets them against each other in a shoot-out that lasts for over an hour.

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Action cinema received a much needed shot in the arm in 2011 with the release of Gareth Evans’s The Raid. The film, a taut Indonesian martial arts masterpiece set in one location was quickly compared to Die Hard. That film gave audiences crisp, clear and expertly crafted fight scenes in a tense and claustrophobic setting. These long unbroken sequences were a breath of fresh air in comparison to the stilted, slow, overly edited fight scenes from modern Hollywood action fare. It would be easy to compare Headshot, the latest film from Indonesian pair Kimo Stamboel & Timo Tjahjanto to The Raid. You can see the elevator pitch,  ‘It’s The Bourne Identity meets The Raid‘ and while it is indebted to both of those films Headshot is very much its own animal. It doesn’t dwell on the amnesia storyline like the former and lacks the big budget Hollywood sheen of the latter. What Headshot delivers is a beautiful, brutal, bloody, bullet riddled action ballet.

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Directed by: Justin Kurzel Starring: Michael Fassbender,  Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons, Brendan Gleeson Running Time: 116 mins


Video game to film adaptations don’t have a great track record. With a solid cast, an exciting premise, and a promising director on board Assassin’s Creed aimed to change all that. Those involved claimed they would be giving us the world’s first truly great video game movie. Like Warcraft earlier in 2016 however, which promised to pull off a similar feat, Assassin’s Creed completely fails to hit the mark. The best that can be said is that it’s not an absolute train-wreck – the film does have a certain amount going for it, and manages to entertain in fits and starts – but mostly Assassin’s Creed is just kind of boring.Read more…

Directed by: Morten Tyldum  Starring: Chris Pratt, Jennifer Lawrence, Michael Sheen  Running Time: 116 mins


Passengers is not the nice romantic sci-fi film you’ve been led to believe. What’s disconcerting is that it thinks it is. Thanks to a horribly misguided plot development in the first act of the movie Passengers is a film so far from what it wants to be that it’s staggering to imagine how anyone involved thought it was a good idea. Not only is this plot development completely unnecessary, it unintentionally transforms the whole thing into a profoundly uncomfortable experience.

Fair warning to all here, it’s going to be kind of impossible to discuss the film’s issues without stating what this plot development entails, so rather than continuing to talk in circles, let it be known there are spoilers ahead!

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Directed by: Gavin O’Connor Starring: Ben Affleck, J.K. Simmons, Anna Kendrick, Jon Berenthal, Cynthia Addai-Robinson, Jeffrey Tambor, John Lithgow Running Time: 128 mins


The Accountant is a bit of an odd mixture of a movie. It sells itself as a smart, stylish, accounting based espionage thriller. Despite such lofty aspirations however, The Accountant is essentially just a big dumb action movie; the kind where characters spout cheesy one-liners to no one in particular before doing something cool. It would have been best to embrace that, but the film can’t seem to decide what kind of movie it wants to be – tongue-in-cheek action movie or serious thriller – it tries to be both, but never fully commits to or succeeds at being either. More “John Wick” than “Jason Bourne”, The Accountant still manages to provide plenty of thrills and (unintentional) laughs along the way.

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Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Tilda Swinton, Mads Mikkelsen, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Wong, Rachel McAdams Directed by: Scott Derrickson Run time: 115mins


Doctor Strange, Marvel’s latest entry in their superhero mega-franchise, is pretty crazy and a whole lot of fun. The film fully embraces its comic book heritage, perhaps more so than any Marvel movie to date. It would be tough to claim this is Marvel’s best effort; the film suffers from many of the usual problems: bland villains, underdeveloped love interests, and an overly familiar origin story structure. What sets this film apart though is that it is filled with some of the most insane and inventive superhero action sequences ever put on screen. Doctor Strange is ridiculous in the best possible way, and many scenes are likely to have fans grinning from ear to ear.

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Director: Ron Howard Starring: Tom Hanks, Felicity Jones, Ben Foster, Irrfan Khan, Sidse Babett Knudsen, Omar Sy Running Time: 121mins


Inferno marks the third time Tom Hanks has teamed up with Ron Howard to adapt a Dan Brown novel. The previous two installments being The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons, both of which were released to fairly mixed results. After two failed attempts, could this third time be the charm? Could the pair have finally gotten it right?

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Director: Colm McCarthy Starring: Gemma Arterton, Paddy Considine, Glenn Close, and Sennia Nanua Run Time: 111mins


In a time when zombie stories feel like they’ve been done to death on both the large and small screen, one can’t help but wonder if the genre has anything fresh or compelling left to offer.  As it turns out, it has;  The Girl With All the Gifts is perhaps the best zombie related movie since 28 Days Later reinvented the genre back in 2002. And although it owes a large debt to that film’s setting, general aesthetic, and “rage fueled” undead, it manages to inject plenty of new life and ideas into the mix.Read more…

Director: David Ayer Starring: Will Smith, Margot Robbie, Viola Davis, Joel Kinnaman, Jay Hernandez, Jared Leto, Jai Courtney, Cara Delevingne Run Time: 130 minutes.


There are reviews out there that would have you believe that this film is a travesty; something to be avoided at all costs. Thankfully, it’s not quite that bad. Ok yes, if we’re being honest Suicide Squad is a complete and utter mess of a movie, but there’s still a lot to enjoy about it. For all of its flaws it’s surprisingly entertaining. The premise is somewhat original, the cast give it their all, and at the end of the day the whole thing just kind of works despite itself.Read more…