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Director: Thaddeus O’Sullivan Starring: Tom Vaughan-Lawlor Running Time: 81 minutes


In picking out names from late 19th-early 20th century Ireland, a time when as George Moore put it, “The sceptre of intelligence moved from London to Dublin”, art collector Hugh Lane may not be the first one that comes to mind. It may not come to mind at all if you’re not a major arts enthusiast. However, the innovative and very interesting Citizen Lane paints a vivid picture of the man as an enigmatic character from a period in Irish history packed full of fascinating figures. Look past the naff title, this unusual mix of documentary and narrative is likely to draw a high appraisal from those who view it.

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Director: Jason Reitman Starring: Charlize Theron, Mackenzie Davis, Ron Livingston, Mark Duplass Running Time: 96 minutes


When Diablo Cody is in a reflective mood, Jason Reitman tends to benefit. Though it will always be a divisive film based on its subject matter and the ‘hamburger phone’ of it all, Juno‘s rooting in the real life experiences of Cody as a teenager and the stories of adoptees and pregnant teens in her life gave it a laudable emotional honesty. The writer-director pair came back together for the underseen Young Adult, a darkly funny and deeply insightful look at arrested development, and the toll taken on the popular girl when she isn’t popular anymore, with a fantastic lead performance from Charlize Theron. Nearly seven years on, the now-trio have convened again for an honest look at parenthood in Tully. The result is raw, sly and very well done.

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Always an exciting part of the calendar in the fair city of film, the Korean Film Festival Ireland will be taking place in early June. Tickets are available now for this celebration of Korean cinema and culture.

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Young filmmakers Matthew Roche and Elliot Milofsky are putting out interesting short films at a fast pace, through their production company Extra Extra. Their latest short, Philomela is the story of a woman who experiences a break-in to her home and is forced to keep the intruder. Though Mela attempts to persuade the guards, her parents and others of the injustice, her words go unheard and the psychological toll on her hits hard. Blunt and stark, it nevertheless makes its point very clearly. It isn’t difficult to figure out the political subtext of Roche and Milofsky’s film, this week in particular. Film In Dublin spoke with Matthew Roche about the thinking behind the short.

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With just 10 days to go until the Referendum on the regulation of termination of pregnancy, it is a vital time to provide information that is honest, both factually and emotionally, to the public. One of a number in the Irish film community making efforts in this regard is Karl Callan, whose short film, simply titled  Repeal aims to tell the stories of women for whom the repealing of the 8th amendment is vital.

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For decades, Nick Cave has kept up an impressive juggling act of many creative talents. The Aussie has won plaudits as a songwriter, a screenwriter, atop live performer, and a unique vocalist – but above all the Bad Seeds frontman is considered a storyteller, and his skills as a storyteller will be celebrated at the Light House Cinema this June.

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On June 27th 2003, the career of aspiring actor Greg Sestero was changed forever with the release of The Room. The bizarre, terrible but captivating film, the So Bad It’s Good cult classic to rule them all, made improbable stars out of Greg and his co-star, director, friend and former roommate, Tommy Wiseau, with the pair frequenting screenings in LA and around the world. Years later, Greg wrote the tell-all book The Disaster Artist with Tom Bissell, and found himself on the N.Y. Times Best Sellers list. His book was a funny, fascinating and poignant look at a crazy story and the friendship behind it, proving to be strong enough to be adapted into a film that raised Greg and Tommy’s profiles higher than ever. More recently Greg turned to writing a screenplay, resulting in Best F(r)iends, described as “a two-volume cinematic ‘saga’ that promises to interweave mystery, intrigue, and more than a few dark laughs”. Before screening he and Tommy’s latest film at the Light House Cinema this past weekend, Greg spoke with Film In Dublin about some of his Movie Memories, his experiences as a writer and of course, about Tommy Wiseau.

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This May, the Cinemagic Film and Television Festival for Young People returns to Dublin from its annual film festival. From May 10th-20th, a bursting schedule featuring 100 events including world cinema screenings, film and television masterclasses, school workshops, Q&As and young critics panels will set out to inspire and motivate young film fans.

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