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Director: Faith Akin Starring: Diane Kruger, Denis Moschitto, Samia Chancrin Running Time: 106 minutes

In The Fade has a lot to offer its audience: a strong central performance from Diane Kruger, a moving story and compelling characters. Yet the film still lacks the power to stay with you once the credits roll. While easy to chew on throughout its reasonable runtime, director Faith Akin’s recent feature leaves you craving something a little more substantial.

The film, which won best foreign language feature at this year’s Golden Globes, tells the story of Katja (Diane Kruger), a German woman confronted with the tragic death of her husband and son following a terrorist attack. When suspects are discovered and brought to court, Katja battles with her need to exact revenge on the people who took her world from her. Should she leave the judicial system to their ways? Or, should she take matters into her own hands?

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The 2018 Audi Dublin International Film Festival kicks off tomorrow evening, and among the many high-profile films on shows, the premieres and the long-awaited international success stories are a number of exciting programmes celebrating both the storied past and the exciting future of film. One example of the former will be taking place at the Irish Film Institute this February, showcasing the work of a man who might be Ireland’s most successful and influential export to Hollywood. Even if he’s a name you might not have heard of.

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Our Countdown to this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival continues today, as we look at Careers in Film Day. One of several insightful events taking place during the festival, Careers in Film Day offers the opportunity for young people to learn from industry professionals about what it takes to forge out a career in film.

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We’re less than a week away from this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival and the anticipation is building quickly in the fair city of film. As the festival approaches, every day Film In Dublin will be counting down by highlighting one of the fascinating, fun and can’t miss events taking place during ADIFF 2018. Today, we highlight a public interview taking place on Saturday 3rd March with award-winning costume designer, Sandy Powell. Throughout a successful career in cinema, Powell has worked frequently with renowned directors including Martin Scorsese, Todd Haynes and Ireland’s own Neil Jordan. A twelve-time Oscar nominee, Powell has won the award on three occasions; for Shakespeare in Love, The Aviator and The Young Victoria.

 

Powell will be on hand during the festival to discuss her career, and with two films that that she has worked on featuring during ADIFF in Todd Haynes’ latest Wonderstruck the sci-fi rom-com How to Talk to Girls at Parties, there is sure to be a lot insight for ADIFF attendees. The host of the evening Eimer Ní Mhaoldomhnaigh is a considerable talent in costume design herself, with credits including Love and FriendshipThe Wind that Shakes the Barley and more.

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carolhttp://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/exclusive-costume-designs-carol

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The full programme for ADIFF 2018 has officially launched. With over 100 feature films being screened, international stars visiting, seven world premieres and plenty of Irish ones, Dublin’s biggest film festival is looking better than ever. Setting the stage for the year to come in the fair city of film, the Audi Dublin International Film Festival is one of the most exciting times of the year for Irish film fans and this year’s programme promises the chance to see some of this year’s most eagerly anticipated movies.

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Director: Dawn Porter Running Time: 81 minutes


The theme of the 2017 Dublin Feminist Film Festival is ‘FeministFutures’, films that ask questions about future generations of women, not just related to science and technology, but also on the challenges facing women moving forward and subjects worth considering as things change for women in Ireland and elsewhere. The 2016 documentary Trapped makes for an excellent choice for an opener to the festival in this regard, depicting an urgent reality for women in the United States that has only continued in importance in the face of the considerable political changes in that country since the film’s release. For viewers in Ireland, the film makes for vital viewing as well, delivering the important message that no matter what happens next year with regards to repealing the 8th Amendment, the job of fighting for reproductive rights for women won’t be finished. Those who look to control and restrict the bodily rights of women will not go away.

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The Dublin Feminist Film Festival celebrates female filmmakers, with the aim of inspiring and empowering more female involvement in filmmaking. The films screened at the festival consider women both on screen and behind it, showcasing stories told by and about women. For four years the festival has showcased great films by women from Ireland and abroad and involved women in film in discussions about their work, and the festival returns November 16 – 18 for a weekend of films that look to the future of women in cinema.

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The cinema equivalent of a Coca Cola truck wheeling into town for Dublin film fans, the Light House Cinema’s announcement of their ‘Naughty or Nice’ season heralds the arrival of the Christmas season, just as the Halloween decorations start coming down. The month of December in the Smithfield cinema is dedicated to Christmas classics, with all your favourite Christmas movies available on the big screen. We don’t know about you, but it’s hard not to look at the amazing artwork above by Chris Judge and not feel the excitement and the nostalgia start to flow. The full season has been announced and tickets are already on sale, so the time to start writing to Santa for two tickets to Die Hard is now.

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Last year saw the Dublin Worker’s Film Festival join the ranks of the many film festivals taking place in Dublin that bring a varied selection of films of diverse and meaningful subject matter to audiences in the nation’s capital. Taking place on Pearse Street, the festival screened three films from the 60s, 80s, and 2010s that addressed issues of the working classes, and this year the festival expands, with a programme of 6 films this October. Whether you get up early enough in the morning for our Taoiseach’s liking we couldn’t possibly say, but you won’t have to be up at the crack of dawn for these films, which span just about 100 years and include some interesting sounding Q and As to boot.

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Love horror? The Irish Film Institute has you more than covered for terror this Halloween with the IFI Horrorthon 2017, the full programme of which we’ve got right here for you. From frightening favourites to creepy cult hits to some petrifying premieres, the varied series has something for everything looking for a scare from October 26 – 30.

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