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With the year that’s in it, it’s perhaps easy to imagine that we have reached gender parity in the film industry (or in Hollywood at least), what with Patty Jenkins behind the biggest blockbuster of the year and the success of female-driven stories like Atomic Blonde and The Beguiled. But considering Jenkins hadn’t directed a film for around 14 years since her debut, neither Marvel or DC had released a female-centric story in this decade of endless superhero movies and the percentage of films directed by women is the same as it was in 1998, we clearly have more steps to take. So we here at Film In Dublin have an announcement…

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70mm showings of Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk have proven to be very popular at the Irish Film Institute, just one factor in making the historical epic a major hit at the Irish box office. As part of the IFI’s commitment to exhibit, preserve and educate, they’re no strangers to showing films in a variety of formats, with authentic prints of films like The Right Stuff being regular features of IFI programming. The most recently announced example is upcoming screenings of a new 70mm print of David Lean’s classic Lawrence of Arabia, which will be showing at the cinema from Oct 20 – 22. But what exactly is the difference between 70mm and the more modern digital? How do great films go from the booth behind you to the screen in front of you? It’s hardly just a matter of pushing play on a DVD, as the IFI’s projectionist Paul Markey explains. Film In Dublin spoke to Paul about the work that he does, different film formats and more.

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Dunkirk is one of those films that sets very high stakes for itself before the trailers are even released. Christopher Nolan took a risk tackling a subject that is still holds significance in the collective memory of so many. That said, the technical brilliance of the film is clear from poster to trailer to the film’s opening moments, so it’s to be expected that the Film In Dublin team would all end up watching Dunkirk on the big screen. We found that our opinions varied from Luke’s “all-out immersive assault on the senses” to “spectacle over emotion” and so we decided to collect some of our team’s reactions to one of the summer’s biggest films. Nolan has always been a divisive director and reactions to Dunkirk have been no different, so check out what our writers had to say.

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This Friday, the Irish documentary Revolutions opens in cinemas. Engaging and accessible, Revolutions offers a look into the rough and tumble world of the unconventional sport of roller derby, as well as a look into the lives of the women who play it. Beginning in 2011, the film follows the players and coaches of Dublin Roller Derby and the Cork City Firebirds, both competing separately and coming together to make up most of the Irish national team that travels to their first roller derby World Cup in Canada, competing against the likes of England and Argentina. Director Laura McGann has been promoting the film – her debut feature after numerous credits on TV shows and documentary shorts – ahead of a special Q&A to launch the film at the IFI on Friday. Film In Dublin spoke to Laura about the allure of roller derby, tension in the teams and the importance of keeping your distance when drinking coffee around athletes racing at high speed on skates.

 

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The summer season may not be delivering much thus far in terms of the big blockbusters, but thankfully as ever, anyone interested in supporting Irish cinema has plenty of options. Today sees the release of Darndale crime movie Cardboard Gangsters, but next week will deliver independent Irish cinema too, in the form of Twice Shy, a romantic drama by director Tom Ryan that has had success on the film festival circuit, including a screening at the Galway Film Fleadh, and a showing at the Irish Film Festival Australia that bagged Ryan an award for Best Young Director. Twice Shy tells the story of two young people falling in love, taking them from the debs in Tipperary to life attending college in the big smoke, interspersed with a car journey with a very important destination for them. Film In Dublin spoke to Tom Ryan about directing the film and the challenges of balancing its love story with more serious topics.

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.


You may not be familiar with the name Dermot Malone, but chances are you’ve seen some of what the director has done in the last few years. A Dublin-based director of advertisements, in 2014 Dermot founded his own production company Banjoman Films and since then has progressed rapidly, from making free online content, to online advertising, to the short film Runner Up which caught the eye of Lovin Dublin and Joe.ie among others, and lately to ‘No More Nice Car’, the widely seen and discussed Nissan advertisement about bullying, sibling bonds and young girls’ empowerment. And about Micras of course.

 

The likes of Lenny Abrahamson have gone on from making acclaimed adverts to acclaimed feature films, so it will be interesting to watch how Dermot Malone and Banjoman Films continue to develop. In the meantime, Film In Dublin spoke to Dermot to get the Direct Line on the up and coming director.

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Rick O’Shea is a familiar name to anyone regularly tuned into the Irish airwaves. A radio presenter with RTÉ 2FM since 2001, Rick also regularly introduces movie premieres in Dublin and has conducted public interviews at the Dublin International Film Festival for the last few years with the likes of Richard Dreyfus, Danny DeVito, Michael Madsen and Harry Shearer. Film In Dublin caught up with Rick to talk about the changing landscape of Dublin cinemas, the problem with book adaptations on the big screen and more.

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Robert O’Brien has been working in the Audio Visual Industry for over 10 years, a love affair that was sparked by his time working in Dublin’s first IMAX Cinema. Sheridan’s theatre was opened in 1998, in the same location where Cineworld currently stands. The iconic cinema was a testament to Dublin’s vibrant film culture which has been a major feature of the city since Jame’s Joyce first opened the Volta Picture Theatre. But just like the Volta, perhaps Sheridan’s IMAX theatre was ahead of its time.

We spoke to Robert about his experiences with the theatre, as well as his crowdfunding campaign to produce a documentary about the theatre from its conception to its unfortunate closure in 2000.

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You may or may not be familiar with #FilmDis, a discussion about portrayals of disability in the media facilitated by Dominick Evans (and guests) on Twitter. Dominick is an aspiring filmmaker and passionate disability rights activist. We are delighted to share that FilmDis has recently gained non-profit status as a media monitoring organisation. We asked Dominick about the organisation’s plans for the future.

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The Rehearsal follows an exclusive, kind of pretentious, acting school for young adults in New Zealand. This runs parallel to the story of a teenage tennis star who sleeps with her Coach, causing a scandal that ripples through the local community. I Blodet (In the Blood) follows a group of four Danish students, trying to navigate through adult life. Both of these films slot into Male Melodrama, and in both the main protagonists start off as Toxic Men. Do they manage to redeem themselves?

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