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For a number of years, Leitrim-based director Sean Clancy has built up his reputation, working on a number of music videos and short films, including the award-winning Cavalier. His first feature film, Locus of Control, tells the story of a struggling stand-up comedian Andrew Egan who is forced to take a teaching job helping the unemployed re-enter the workforce. As Andrew grows accustomed to the droll institution and its occupants he suspects that one of the students is out to get him and that the previous teacher may not have left of his own accord. His life slowly unravels and both Andrew’s lessons and stand-up gigs fall on deaf ears and he finds himself trapped in a larger cosmic joke. The film was shown last month as one of the Irish features at the Silk Road Film Festival, and this Thursday will be the opening feature of the second Dublin Sci-Fi Film Festival. Ahead of that screening of the film, written, directed and edited by Clancy, Film In Dublin caught up with the up and coming Irish director.

 

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The New Music is a film that looks at a little know medical condition, as well as the struggle to readjust your life when things don’t turn out the way you initially planned. The film tells the story of Adrian, a classical pianist with extraordinary talent, who discovers he has Young Onset Parkinson’s, a rare form of Parkinson’s Disease affecting sufferers under fifty. Despite this debilitating condition, Adrian joins a punk band as a keyboard player and rediscovers his life through music and love.

The shooting of the film has now concluded, with a crowd-funding campaign underway to ensure the film’s release and raise funds for Young Parkinson’s Ireland. Film In Dublin spoke with the film’s director Chiara Viale, as well as actor Cilléin McEvoy about the film and their efforts to see it released.

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This January, the first Dublin Smartphone Film Festival took place at the Generator Hostel in Smithfield, a weekend showcasing the possibilities of smartphone filmmaking. With experienced hands like Steven Soderbergh experimenting with the format, its prominence is only growing, but a new generation of directors are taking up their phones and the opportunities accessible tech is affording them to create films of their own. Two such emerging talents are Matthew Roche and Elliot Milofsky, independent Irish film-makers currently studying Philosophy in Dublin. As part of ‘Extra Extra’, the pair just finished their latest short film Lady Luck, a submission for the Moment Invitational Film Festival. Their last short film Far won “Best Irish Film” at the Dublin Smartphone Film Festival and even since then the pair have been directing more shorts, all completed only with a smartphone. Film In Dublin spoke with the pair about their efforts in filmmaking and in getting others to realise the potential of the phones in their pockets.

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.


Ross McDonnell is both a photographer and filmmaker, with credits in photography, cinematography and directing on several documentary films. Born in Dublin, Ireland in 1979. As a photographer, his work has been published in The New York Times, Art in America, The Observer, The Washington Post, The Irish Times, Fader magazine and more. A twp-time nominee for Irish Film and Television Awards, his films have screened at festivals around the world, including last year’s Elián, an official selection at the Tribeca Film Festival. A frequent collaborator with Alex Gibney, McDonnell worked on the director’s most recent film, No Stone Unturned – a documentary about a flare up of the violence of the Troubles in Co. Down in 1994, released last November.

 

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With a seemingly endless supply of big budget blockbusters, superhero flicks and glamorous award contenders on our screens, it can be hard to find the time for smaller, independent movies. Despite our endeavour to deliver you all things film, even we here at Film in Dublin have had some remarkable films fly under our radar throughout the past year. With this in mind, we have spent the holiday season looking back on this year’s greatest and most under-appreciated movies in an effort to prepare you for your annual office Oscar party. Now you can have bragging rights over the most obscure and brilliant films that your colleagues and friends may have missed in 2017!

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It has been a year. In 2017 there was a lot for film fans to contemplate, but in what they say on the screen and in the wider film business. Month after month, entertaining, challenging and interesting films found their way onto Irish screens, either from Hollywood or any number of our own talented Irish directors. It was a year where the sickeningly pervasive culture of abuse in cinema was thrust into the headlines by brave survivors no longer willing to suffer in silence. It was also a year in great filmmaking, where talented, diverse directors were given the opportunity to show their talent, several for the first time, where performances transported us just as believably to the far-off future, the underprivileged, overlooked present and even outside the fluid realm of time altogether. This is Film In Dublin’s list of the best films of 2017, the films that moved us, entertained us, opened our eyes and otherwise expressed everything that cinema is meant to be, in a year that showed that cinema doesn’t always achieve those lofty ideals behind the scenes.

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November 24 -26 will see the return of Dub Web Fest, Ireland’s celebration of online storytelling. Now in its third year, this film festival curated for online programming will have among its programme a MasterClass workshop in editing to be delivered by the experienced and renowned Irish editor Tony Kearns. From advertisements of the likes of Lynx, the Lotto and Playstation to acclaimed music videos including ‘Just’ by Radiohead and ‘Firestarter’ by The Prodigy, chances are high that you’ve seen his work, even if you haven’t realised it. More recently, Kearns has edited a number of feature films, including Cardboard Gangsters, the true crime drama set in the heart of Darndale. Film In Dublin spoke with Tony ahead of Dub Web Fest, to get his insights into the editing process.

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With the year that’s in it, it’s perhaps easy to imagine that we have reached gender parity in the film industry (or in Hollywood at least), what with Patty Jenkins behind the biggest blockbuster of the year and the success of female-driven stories like Atomic Blonde and The Beguiled. But considering Jenkins hadn’t directed a film for around 14 years since her debut, neither Marvel or DC had released a female-centric story in this decade of endless superhero movies and the percentage of films directed by women is the same as it was in 1998, we clearly have more steps to take. So we here at Film In Dublin have an announcement…

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70mm showings of Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk have proven to be very popular at the Irish Film Institute, just one factor in making the historical epic a major hit at the Irish box office. As part of the IFI’s commitment to exhibit, preserve and educate, they’re no strangers to showing films in a variety of formats, with authentic prints of films like The Right Stuff being regular features of IFI programming. The most recently announced example is upcoming screenings of a new 70mm print of David Lean’s classic Lawrence of Arabia, which will be showing at the cinema from Oct 20 – 22. But what exactly is the difference between 70mm and the more modern digital? How do great films go from the booth behind you to the screen in front of you? It’s hardly just a matter of pushing play on a DVD, as the IFI’s projectionist Paul Markey explains. Film In Dublin spoke to Paul about the work that he does, different film formats and more.

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