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Director: Marie Monge Starring: Stacy Martin, Tahar Rahim Running Time: 105 minutes


It’s common practice for films in France to have very different titles in their native tongue than in the translated English. Marie Monge’s Treat Me Like Fire goes by the more straightforward Joueurs (“Players”) when shown at home, as it was during last year’s Cannes Film Festival. They seem like very different names at a glance but both ultimately have the same energy; Treat Me Like Fire a Lana Del Rey-ven cigarette exhale on the film’s story of burning, fleeting, dangerous romance, while “Players” is more Stevie Nicks to the ears, an indication not just of the film’s gambling content but of the general circumstances under which players will love you.

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Director: Wanuri Kahiu Starring: Samantha Mugatsia, Sheila Munyiva Running Time: 82 minutes


One of 2018’s more underseen and personable films in a collection of new romantic comedies was Love Simon , a queer teen romance that managed to jog where other films had once walked, allowing itself to focus funly, freely and  matter-of-factly on the romance of its gay lead in a setting where other obstacles where pointedly settled. Wanuri Kahiu’s story of queer African adolescence deserves plenty of props for following in that vein as much as it can, focusing on the falling stage of two young Kenyan girls’ romance in spite of and beyond the very real national contextRafiki is a delicate but vibrant love story, a smile that can’t help breaking out.

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Director: Mimi Leder Starring: Felicity Jones, Armie Hammer Runtime: 120 minutes

With the close of 2018 having put the integrity of the United States Supreme Court seats in the spotlight, the story of the remarkable Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg is something that has been a notable cinematic feature of early 2019. This feature length adaptation of Ginsberg’s formative legal years could perhaps best be watched alongside the documentary RBG, which has garnered more critical acclaim thus far, securing a nomination for Best Documentary Feature at the Oscars.

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The New Music is a new Irish film about a classical pianist with Young Onset Parkinson’s disease who joins a Dublin punk band. It aims to shine a light on this rare and little known condition which affects those under 50 years of age.
The film has the full support of Young Parkinson’s Ireland and is currently raising funds to complete post production for its completion deadline in March.  As the film closes in on its funding goals, they have announced a table quiz night in an effort to secure the final funds needed for release.

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The Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2019 has begun! Already the year’s seminal celebration of cinema in the fair city of film has held numerous exciting events. Just this morning, Irish filmmaker Paddy Breathnach hosted a workshop with Sean Bailey of Walt Disney Studios Motion Picture Production, engaging Irish industry professionals with one of the most prominent players. Young minds got a chance to have an early look at The Kid Who Would Be King, Joe Cornish’s exciting family adventure film. There’s a lot to keep track of and the festival hasn’t even had it’s Opening Gala yet, formally launching tonight with the Irish premiere of John Butler’s latest film, Papi Chulo .To help our readers navigate through this fantastic fortnight of film, we’ve picked out a couple of highlights from this year’s programme. You can check out the full schedule here but before then, make sure to give our highlights a look:

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Ahead of the release of Irish horror The Hole in the Ground, Film In Dublin caught up with director Lee Cronin and star Séana Kerslake to chat about filming in the forest, working with young actor James Quinn Markey and more.

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Director: Barry Jenkins Starring: KiKi Layne, Stephan James, Regina King Running Time: 117 minutes


“I hope that nobody has ever had to look at anybody they love through glass.”

The words of James Baldwin, from a character that sadly knows that plenty have had to look at someone they love through glass, or through some restriction or another, few, if any, deserving to have their full hearts clutched by oppressive fists. As a writer who felt even harder than he thought and had too many of his own restrictions, it’s hard to blame the writer for his frustrations that ignored that pathos. Writing about the cinema of his time that aimed to show the black experience, socially active author Baldwin only ever found it inadequate. Their feel-good narratives rang false, tripping gracelessly over themselves to reassure and reframe for guiltily ignorant, or ignorantly guilty, white audiences. We can’t speak for Baldwin, but in adapting his novel If Beale Street Could Talk, Barry Jenkins has clearly and skillfully endeavoured to present a lived experience that is genuine, lives that feel real, and a lush love story that is all the more enriched by that effort to be genuine.

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