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Director: David Freyne Starring: Ellen Page, Sam Keeley, Tom Vaughan-Lawlor Running Time: 96 minutes

The Cured picks up where most zombie movies end. Society has reintroduced some degree of normality. Hordes of ravenous undead have stopped terrorising the streets. People are beginning to feel safe in their own homes again. However, as communities begin rebuilding themselves, once infected citizens, now cured of their insatiable appetites, are re-introduced back onto the streets, much to the outrage and disdain of the masses. It is in this setting – the aftermath of the bloodshed – that The Cured chooses to tell its story, a story less concerned with jumping out from behind corners to scare you than it is with burrowing deep within your conscious and challenging you.

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Once a year, Dublin’s Cineworld showcases its centrepiece: its IMAX theater, with the ‘IMAX Film Festival‘. The selection of blockbusters, well suited to the biggest of big screens, is coming back this March, offering films fans the chance to see some popular blockbusters of the past year once again.

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Director: Lance Daly Starring: Hugo Weaving, James Frecheville, Stephen Rea, Freddy Fox, Barry Keoghan, Moe Dunford, Jim Broadbent Running Time: 96 minutes


For an event that had such a profound impact on the course of Irish history, the great tragedy and injustice from which Ireland’s entire subsequent history as a nation sprang forth from, it’s surprising that the Famine hasn’t found its story told on cinema screens, particularly Irish ones, more often. Director Lance Daly takes that task on in Black 47, last week’s Opening Gala of the 2018 Dublin International Film Festival. His approach is perhaps unexpected considering the subject matter, the film being a roaring rampage of revenge, internalising the anger and injustice of the Famine into one man’s quest for vengeance. Prestigous? No. But undoubtedly compelling.

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Director: Faith Akin Starring: Diane Kruger, Denis Moschitto, Samia Chancrin Running Time: 106 minutes

In The Fade has a lot to offer its audience: a strong central performance from Diane Kruger, a moving story and compelling characters. Yet the film still lacks the power to stay with you once the credits roll. While easy to chew on throughout its reasonable runtime, director Faith Akin’s recent feature leaves you craving something a little more substantial.

The film, which won best foreign language feature at this year’s Golden Globes, tells the story of Katja (Diane Kruger), a German woman confronted with the tragic death of her husband and son following a terrorist attack. When suspects are discovered and brought to court, Katja battles with her need to exact revenge on the people who took her world from her. Should she leave the judicial system to their ways? Or, should she take matters into her own hands?

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Director: Craig Gillespie Starring: Margot Robbie, Sebastian Stan, Allison Janney, Paul Walter Hauser Running Time: 120 minutes

At the inaugural turn of the 24-hour news cycle, around-the-clock coverage meant that more people had access to stories from across the globe. By the early 90s before white broncos sped down Los Angeles highways or actors were caught in suspicious alleys, one particular celebrity scandal in the US crossed the pond to make international headlines; the feud between olympic figure skaters Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding.

As a result of constant media coverage, Harding’s story was elevated from local crime to worldwide scandal overnight, as people lined up to watch the downfall of this notable figure and Olympic hopeful. Now, years later, director Craig Gillespie and star/producer Margot Robbie have joined forces to bring us I, Tonya, a black comedy based on the shocking and wildly contradictory first-hand accounts of all those involved.

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The 2018 Audi Dublin International Film Festival kicks off tomorrow evening, and among the many high-profile films on shows, the premieres and the long-awaited international success stories are a number of exciting programmes celebrating both the storied past and the exciting future of film. One example of the former will be taking place at the Irish Film Institute this February, showcasing the work of a man who might be Ireland’s most successful and influential export to Hollywood. Even if he’s a name you might not have heard of.

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Director: Paul Thomas Anderson Starring: Daniel Day-Lewis, Vicky Krieps, Lesley Manville Running Time: 130 minutes


Throughout his long and acclaimed career, Daniel Day-Lewis has embodied personalities that burst forth from the screen, simply too powerful, or imposing, or strong of will to be restrained by mere celluloid and silver. From Christy Brown to Daniel Plainview to Abraham-by-God-Lincoln, DDL has method acted his way through dominating characters, willing audiences into awe, the most impressive man in the room when he isn’t really in it. In his supposed last performance, as the wonderfully and ludicrously named Reynolds Woodcock, DDL applies that same level of performance and applies it to a fussy dressmaker in the immaculate fashion scene of 1950s London. Working once again with Paul Thomas Anderson, the pair have taken what may seem at first glance to be an understated love story and intricately sown some of their best work just underneath the surface, a beautiful piece of work with as many hidden thrills as anything their fascinating main character himself might design.

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Our Countdown to this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival continues today, as we look at Careers in Film Day. One of several insightful events taking place during the festival, Careers in Film Day offers the opportunity for young people to learn from industry professionals about what it takes to forge out a career in film.

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The 2018 Irish Film and Television Academy Film and Drama Awards were held in Dublin last night. The awards, a celebration of the last year for Irish talent, Irish film and scripted drama, took place in the Mansion House, with Deirdre O’Kane hosting the occasion. Frank Berry’s Michael Inside was among the big winners on the night, picking up the award for Best Film. Aisling Walsh was the winner of Best Director for her work on Maudie, while stars Saoirse Ronan, Barry Keoghan and Cillian Murphy were among the winners in the acting categories. John Connors, star of hit crime drama Cardboard Gangsters, was the winner in the Best Actor category, and made a moving speech celebrating his success in spite of the difficulty he faces getting cast as a member of the Travelling community.

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Upcoming Irish-made horror The Cured has received a release date on these shores it was announced today. A new take on zombie horror that will also be screening at this year’s Audi Dublin International Film Festival, The Cured will get a general release for Irish audiences this Spring.

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