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With a body of work in American cinema spanning over fifty years, a pair of Oscars, numerous nominations and widespread praise the world over, few actors have had a career as successful as Dustin Hoffman and this summer, the IFI offers the chance to see some of his greatest roles on the big screen once again.

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Director: Seth Gordon Starring: Dwayne Johnson, Zac Efron, Priyanka Chopra, Alexandra Daddario, Kelly Rohrbach Running Time: 119 minutes


After a near-totally negative reaction from critics to his latest film, Baywatch lead Dwayne Johnson took to Twitter to insist that “the fans’ love the movie” and that it was made for them anyway, not the critics. It is entirely possible that Baywatch fans wouldn’t set the bar too high. They did after all keep the television series on the air for 11(!) years, ogling heaving chests as inane plots about diamond smuggling surfers or other such sub-airport novel cheese sailed by mostly unnoticed. A few laughs, some beautiful people and a heavy dose of cheese would probably be enough, but Baywatch‘s biggest problem is how often it loses sight of its own stupidity, somehow buying into itself as though its stories about teamwork, overcoming selfishness and thwarting corrupt beachside property developers are actually compelling. Just like Dwayne Johnson tackles bad reviews with all the emojis, exclamation marks and critic-bashing of someone who unconvincingly insists that they aren’t mad at all, Baywatch isn’t as in on the joke as it wants you to believe it is.

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June 16th. Bloomsday. A day of Ulysses readings, landmark visitations and general celebration of James Joyce, one of Dublin’s most famous sons. There’s never any shortage of things to do for Joyce fans on June 16th, but what about those that want to spend the day, or indeed every day, celebrating Jeff Goldblum? Worry not Goldblum lovers, as the Light House have been sufficiently preoccupied with whether they could, and correctly arrived at the thought that they should, host ‘Jeff Goldblum’s Day’ that same Friday.

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Two legends of cinema are being celebrated throughout June and the start of July at the Light House Cinema as their programme Hepburn Forever screens the work of Audrey and Katharine Hepburn. Two true icons of 20th century Hollywood, the films of the (non-related) Hepburns will be sure to bring a touch of glitz and glamour to the Smithfield cinema, making for one classy way to kick off the summer.

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A Masterclass in directing comes to the Brooks Hotel on Drury Street next Monday, courtesy if the Women in Film and Television Ireland and the director Aisling Walsh. Following her latest film Maudie‘s showings at the Toronto Film Festival and ADIFF 2017, Walsh will be talking about directing and writing for the screen from 6-9pm next Monday, 29 May.

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Director: Ridley Scott Starring: Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup, Danny McBride Running Time: 123 minutes


Almost forty years ago now, the minds of Dan O’Bannon and the then up-and-coming director Ridley Scott crossed with the cold and violently Freudian imagery of H.R. Giger and created Alien. A massive hit, Alien took the science-fiction adventure dreams that were launched in viewers two years earlier by Star Wars  and curdled them into a nightmare; not an Expanded Universe that invites exploration, but a cruel one that punished hubristic humans who wander where they’re not wanted. Alien‘s success and its iconic imagery made it a no-brainer for franchise material, and after the interpretations of other directors-some welcome, most not-and some regrettable dust-ups with Predators, Scott returned to the space where no one can hear you scream, first with the yes-but-no-but-yes prequel Prometheus and now with the bridge-gapping Alien: Covenant. These latest films may have their faults, quite a few in fact, but at least Scott is back for reasons other than money or brand building, instead using the old world he helped create to explore new ideas. It’s just unfortunate that having ideas at all puts Scott one up on any of the characters in these films, who almost never have two brain cells to rub together.

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Director: William Oldroyd Starring: Florence Pugh, Cosmo Jarvis, Naomi Ackie, Christopher Fairbank, Paul Hilton Running Time: 89 minutes


It can tend to get a bit grim in the English countryside. The foggy fields suggest a certain emptiness, a setting where taciturn people keep secrets from each other until either their passions suddenly ignite or they Eleanor Rigby themselves to quiet, dignified, sad demises. Take the similarly cheer-resistant world of Russian literature and place it in that setting and you’re unlikely to end up with the feel good hit of the summer. But as evidenced by Alice Birch and William Oldroyd’s adaptation of Nikolai Leskov’s Lady Macbeth of the Mtensk District, what you do end up with is a captivatingly twisted take on English costume drama that you can’t take your eyes away from.

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In Direct Line, Film In Dublin cuts to the chase, asking 20 questions of Ireland’s directors to get a brief look into their outlooks, influences and inspirations.


You may not be familiar with the name Dermot Malone, but chances are you’ve seen some of what the director has done in the last few years. A Dublin-based director of advertisements, in 2014 Dermot founded his own production company Banjoman Films and since then has progressed rapidly, from making free online content, to online advertising, to the short film Runner Up which caught the eye of Lovin Dublin and Joe.ie among others, and lately to ‘No More Nice Car’, the widely seen and discussed Nissan advertisement about bullying, sibling bonds and young girls’ empowerment. And about Micras of course.

 

The likes of Lenny Abrahamson have gone on from making acclaimed adverts to acclaimed feature films, so it will be interesting to watch how Dermot Malone and Banjoman Films continue to develop. In the meantime, Film In Dublin spoke to Dermot to get the Direct Line on the up and coming director.

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Director: John Madden Starring: Jessica Chastain, Mark Strong, Gugu Mbatha-Raw Running Time: 132 minutes


 

In John Madden’s Miss Sloane, the determined and ruthless D.C. lobbyist Madeline Elizabeth Sloane (Jessica Chastain) is treated with a blend of fear and respect by all those around her. After being asked to support a pro-gun group in their fierce opposition of a new bipartisan bill which would see stricter gun control laws imposed on those purchasing firearms, Sloane decides to leave her prestigious lobbying firm behind to join the much smaller and significantly less powerful firm run by Rodolfo Schmidt (Mark Strong) and pass the new bill through the Senate. However, Sloane soon realises the depths to which both her and her opponents must sink in order to get what they want.

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Hosted by the Embassy for the Republic of Korea, the Korean Film Festival: Ireland is a cultural celebration of Korea through the nation’s cinema. The festival returns to the Light House Cinema from June 8th-10th and provides the opportunity to see films from one of the leading nations in international cinema for free.

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