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Directors: John Musker & Ron Clements Starring: Auli’i Cravalho, Dwayne Johnson, Rachel House, Temuera Morrison, Jermaine Clement, Nicole Sherzinger, Alan Tudyk Running Time: 113 minutes


From the release of Mulan in 1998 onwards, Disney animation has aimed for a more proactive set of Princesses, girls who take a more active role in their own story without having to be rescued by a handsome, strong-chinned hero. While refining that process, Disney has still stuck to the same basic structure for the Princess side of their animation department, with songs, animal sidekicks and heroes who just need to believe in themselves. Moana undoubtedly follows that same Disney formula, but if the songs are good, the animal sidekicks are funny and the heroes are worth believing in, who cares?

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Directed by: Clint Eastwood Starring: Tom Hanks, Aaron Eckhart, Laura Linney, Anna Gunn Running Time: 96 mins


There are a few questions hanging over Sully. Chief among them being, did this really need to be made into a film?

Based on the true story of the “Miracle on the Hudson” – an event that happened less than a decade ago that will undoubtedly be fairly fresh in many viewers’ minds – what can this Clint Eastwood-directed adaptation bring to the story? Can it justify its existence and create a compelling narrative? The answers are not all that positive.

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“Have you got Soul Brother”? It has been 25 years since Alan Parker’s The Commitments appeared on our cinema screens and charmed its way into our hearts. Comprised of unknown performers and set in working class Ireland, this adaptation of one of Roddy Doyle’s most famous works captured the brutal economic hardships of a post-recession Dublin but also the zest and exuberance of what it was like to be young and have a dream.

In 1991, Ireland had the youngest population in Europe and some of the highest unemployment. The Commitments depicted a gritty working class Dublin that up until this time was absent in Irish cinema. A lot has changed in the 25 years since the film’s initial release.  Now a hugely successful West End Musical, the show has recently enjoyed several sell out shows here in Dublin. What better time for Film in Dublin to break down this Irish classic and see if it still has soul after all these years?

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Dublin’s top purrveyors (that’s the last one, promise) of ‘Midnight Movies’ – cinema best seen after dark with a few tall glasses of water – Hollywood Babylon have announced their selection for their Christmas Party showing. For anyone who’d like to see something other than Elf this Christmas, or something other than Elf five times this Christmas, they will be screening Batman Returns at the Light House Cinema.

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The theme for Feminist Film Festival Dublin 2016 was ‘Othered Voices’, exploring both literal and figurative female voices in film. Margarita With A Straw allows Laila, a zesty young woman who struggles with how others perceive her cerebral palsy, to find self-acceptance. The film was directed by Shonali Bose who based the story on both her cousin and aspects of her own coming-of-age, and this personal touch shines throughout.

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Directed by: Mark Waters Starring: Billy Bob Thornton, Kathy Bates, Tony Cox, Christina Hendricks Running Time: 92mins


Bad Santa 2 opens with our lead character sticking his head in an oven, attempting to kill himself by way of ‘inert gas asphyxiation’. Set thirteen years after the original film Bad Santa, Willie Soke (played by the ever-watchable Billy Bob Thornton) is no longer enjoying the happy ending he seemingly achieved at the conclusion of the previous installment. His life has become a living nightmare of alcoholism, loneliness, despair and banal repetition. He sees fit to end it all lest he be subjected to any more of life’s countless tortures.

Unfortunately the oven is electric.Read more…

After tape traders in Nigeria decided to start shooting their own movies on (relatively cheap) videotape to keep their store shelves full, the output of the Nigerian film industry exploded. ‘Nollywood’ as it has been called is now second only to India in the number of films it puts out every year, ahead of even Hollywood, which simple can’t reboot Spider-Man often enough to match the amount of films Nigeria puts out every year. For Westerners, the volume of ‘Nollywood’ is one of the only things known about it, and as the industry continues to develop in Nigeria, it will be worth observing trends there and how they compare and contrast with those of America, or of our own film industry. The closing film of last weekend’s Feminist Film Festival Dublin, short documentary Amaka’s Kin: The Women of Nollywood provides one inportant perspective of Nigerian cinema, focusing on women working behind the camera in one of the world’s biggest hubs of film.

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It’s Christmaaaaaaaas! Almost. Before the man in the big red suit arrives, the Light House Cinema is giving us the chance to indulge our Naughty or Nice sides with a slew of festive favourites in the run up to Christmas through to New Year’s Eve.

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Sri Lankan-born artist Paul Weerasekera has been living in Ireland for 25 years and recently moved to Dublin having spent most of that time in Limerick. Trained as an architect, Weerasekera also studied art and design in the UK, before making his way over here, and the artist currently teaches in both Limerick and Dublin.  His most recent series of paintings, ‘CINEMA’, transports famous movie characters onto canvas and has been on display at Filmbase as part of Dub Web Fest. The exhibition ends with the festival tomorrow, but all of the paintings from this exhibition remain available for purchase, with proceeds aiding the Irish Cancer Society. From old Hollywood icons like John Wayne to Christopher Nolan’s take on Batman, Paul Weerasekera’s paintings cover a wide range of Hollywood history. We have a gallery after the jump with just some of the paintings that make up the ‘CINEMA’ exhibition.

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