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If there’s one thing that Quentin Tarantino is known for (apart from his love of feet), it’s his ability to craft unforgettable imagery. Whether it’s a blood-splattered tableau or dancing in a diner, Tarantino and his cinematographers are always guaranteed to come together and make beautiful images that linger long in the memory. What’s more, the movies of Quentin Tarantino always have great posters, hardly a surprise given how the ‘coming soon’ posters of the grungy grindhouse and video store are so firmly part of the Tarantino aesthetic. Everybody knows someone who had a Reservoir Dogs poster on their wall in college and if you don’t, chances are it was a Pulp Fiction poster. With that in mind it’s hardly surprising that artists from around the world would be inspired to make fan posters of their own for Tarantino’s movies. To mark the Sugar Club’s ongoing Tarantino Week, we’ve collected some of the best fan posters around based on the movies of Quentin Tarantino. The most fitting tribute that can be given to these is that they would have made just as good posters as the originals. Enjoy the gallery.

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If the release of ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’ has reignited your love of the franchise or made you sorely miss how good Harry Potter used to be, you’re in luck. Movies @ Swords, Movies @ Dundrum, Movies @ Gorey and SGC Dungarvan are bringing the magic back to the big screen in the run-up to the release of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

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Director: Matt Ross Starring: Viggo Mortensen, George MacKay, Frank Langella Running Time: 118 minutes

Captain Fantastic is a road film with a difference. Viggo Mortensen plays Ben, a father of six who has misguidedly decided to raise his children in the woods with no formal education. When his wife Leslie dies, the bubble bursts and slowly Ben comes to face the fact that perhaps encouraging your children to run wild isn’t the best parenting style after all. This revelation dawns as the family climb aboard their hippy-style school bus – affectionately named Steve – to venture into civilisation to attend Leslie’s funeral. Unfortunately, her father is no fan of Ben’s so there are a few bumps in the road.

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Director: Akiva Schaffer, Jorma Taccone Starring: Andy Samberg, Akiva Schaffer, Jorma Taccone Runtime: 87 minutes

Its almost impossible for Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping to avoid comparisons with This Is Spinal Tap, the benchmark of musical mockumentary. When Spinal Tap was shown to the kind of rock stars it was lampooning, they sat stone-faced, with the likes of Steven Tyler saying “everything that happened in that movie happened to me.” Its hard to say whether the vacuous pop stars sent up by Lonely Island crew Andy Samberg, Akiva Schaffer and Jorma Taccone would have the same reaction, either because the events of Popstar are so cartoony or because the real life antics of Bieber and co are even cartoonier. Still, Popstar comes closer to Spinal Tap’s level (eleven of course) than most.

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Hollywood Babylon is at it again; this time bringing eighties classics Pretty in Pink and Valley Girl back to the big screen at the Lighthouse cinema. The event is being held on September 17th in celebration of the 30th Anniversary of the release of Pretty in Pink.  As an added bonus, the Lighthouse bar will be hosting a mini-prom before the screenings.

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The Audi Dublin International Film Festival may have been and gone earlier this year, but the festival organisers are devoted to keeping its spirit going throughout the year. With that in mind, ADIFF has arranged for the stars and director of upcoming film Anthropoid to attend the film’s Irish premiere on Wednesday 31 August.

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Directors: Ariel Schulman & Henry Joost Starring: Emma Roberts, Dave Franco Running Time: 96 minutes


The premise of Nerve, where teenagers play a super popular smartphone game that can make you a viral sensation or send you wandering thoughtlessly into harms way, has managed to become more plausible in the time between its conception and its release. In the game Nerve you’re either a Player; your life on display to the whole world, taking on dares for cash, or a Watcher; suggesting the dares, giving the money and commenting lewdly and anonymously. Directors Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost have a decent grasp on how young people engage with technology. They also know how our morality becomes murky when we can hide who we are online (they previously directed Catfish). Their film is at its best when they use that knowledge to show why a game like this would appeal to teens and struggles when its time to learn a Valuable Lesson.

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As you may remember, Irish cinema will be represented at the Toronto International Film Festival by The Secret Scripture, Unless, Maudie and Without Name, Northern Irish Film The Journey and the Irish co-production Forever Pure. Handsome Devil directed by John Butler (The Stag) and Gerard Barrett’s Brain on Fire (Glassland) have just been announced as additions to the line-up. That brings the total of Irish productions being recognised at the festival to a whopping eight.

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