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Clare Dunne’s Herself , the Closing Gala at this year’s Dublin International Film Festival  received rave reviews today at Sundance, a possible sign that we may already have the next great Irish film this decade with it only 25 days old. Further to that, the film’s festival success shows how Ireland’s international reputation is continuing to grow; programmers, distributors and viewers alike from all over the world are looking out for Irish talents more and more. The last ten years have seen our profile expand considerably, Hollywood stars like Saoirse Ronan and Colin Farrell are more acclaimed than ever, filmmakers are flocking to our island to make use of our beautiful locations and talented crews, it’s not all sweetness and sunshine but it’s been a good decade. It took a bit of mulling over, so strong was the fear of leaving great work out of a list of only ten, but at last here is Film In Dublin’s celebration of some of the best Irish films of the 2010s, classics that we’ll be going back to again and again.

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There was much discussion about the jokes that Ricky Gervais made at the expense of Hollywood superstars at this year’s Golden Globes. However, what stood out for me was what should have won an award for the “golden quote” of the night. It came from the director of the highly anticipated South Korean film Parasite, Bong Joon-ho. He gave the much needed reminder that:

 

“Once you overcome the one-inch tall barrier of subtitles, you will be introduced to so many more amazing films”.

 

This really spoke to me- and not just in English. If I could add one addendum to this brilliant insight, it would be that viewing international films also exposes you to different cultural fabrics, different challenges and, different experiences. Aside from that, they’re also very entertaining and remain such an underappreciated cinematic art by large chunks of Western audiences. So in order to help you get over the horrific inconvenience of subtitles, and in light of Bong Joon-ho’s golden quote. Here are 20 international films to watch in 2020.

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Director: Melina Matsoukas Starring: Jodie Turner-Smith, Daniel Kaluyaa, Bokeem Woodbine, Chloë Sevigny Running Time: 132 minutes

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The first thing I noticed about Queen and Slim was the theatrical poster. I was coming out of a cinema and was taken aback by the aesthetics of the gritty garage backdrop, contrasted with the glossy greyscale shine. While Daniel Kaluuya played a crime boss in Steve McQueen’s Widows, it was the first time he came off as a true “tough guy” to me. While intrigued as to the plot, I decided to keep prior research to a minimum and walk into Queen and Slim with a blind eye.

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The full programme for the Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2020 was launched at the Light House Cinema in Smithfield this afternoon. VMDIFF Director Gráinne Humphreys announced details of this year’s programme, a 12 day extravaganza of cinema and an opportunity to see the very best of world cinema and film talent in Dublin.

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The Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival is always a good opportunity to cast eyes over some of the latest talents making a name for themselves in Irish film. The Discovery Award at DIFF identifies, supports and encourages new and emerging talent in the Irish film industry, both in front of and behind the camera. Thirteen exciting emerging talents have been nominated for this year’s Award, sponsored this year by Aer Lingus, with the announcement of the winner taking place at a special event in Café En Seine, Dawson Street on the closing day of the festival on Sunday 8 March, 2020. Aer Lingus have also been announced as the “Official Airline Sponsor” of the Festival. Hey somebody has to fly those international guests in, right?

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Excitement is beginning to build for this year’s edition of the Dublin International Film Festival. With announcements gradually trickling out from VMDIFF and a full programme announcement taking place next week, the biggest film festival in the Dublin calendar will be upon us again soon and this year’s edition is going to the dogs, in the best way possible. The festival have announced that a dog-friendly screening will be taking place this year, a great opportunity to finally bring a bit of culture into the lives of Dublin’s philistine canines!

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The nominations for the 92nd edition of the Academy Awards have been announced this afternoon. The 2020 edition of the Oscars will be taking place this year on February the 9th. Film fans worldwide will be turning their eyes – whether they are willing to admit it or not – to the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood to see which of this year’s accolades will be delighting or more likely disappointing us all. Not to editorialise…

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The Dublin Smartphone Film Festival is an international festival dedicated to celebrating works shot using Smartphones and Tablets.  Returning for a third year, the festival will open up filmmaking to a wider circle of creatives this January, offering “limitless possibilities in the palm of your hand”.

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The Silk Road International Film Festival is returning to Dublin. One of the first festivals on the calendar in the capital, the festival will be hosting its eighth edition between the 21st & 25th January 2020, screening a variety of international cinema and providing a showcase of features, documentaries, shorts, music videos & student films. The festival this year is being held in January in order to coincide with the celebrations of the Chinese New Year, and will provide the opportunity to begin another exciting year in the fair city of film for those who appreciate celebrating a diverse range of cinema.

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It can be hard to evaluate the best films of the 2010s, when every damn year of the decade, especially from 2015 onward, have felt like ten years unto themselves. But movies, as ever, offer respite from that chaos. It’s been a decade that has offered impressive new voices in film and given different voices bigger platforms. Names like Jordan Peele, Ava DuVerney, Ryan Coogler and more have opened up important ideas to wider audiences, while also delivering top class entertainment. Long-term talents, from Scorsese and Soderbergh to Bong Joon-ho,  Todd Haynes and Katheryn Bigelow, have changed with the times and done great work, even when it hasn’t been their defining masterpieces, these greats have produced films that audiences have latched onto and continue to engage with in interesting ways, our often noxious online discourse still providing the opportunity to grow cultural conversation. Still, that noxious shite can make even the most ardent film lover never want to talk about cinema again, and the last ten years have seen too many unwinnable bullshit battles waged by people determined to keep their beloved franchises for themselves only, or draft movies, sometimes at random, into the unending culture wars.

Netflix have changed the game completely for film distribution and audience engagement in ways we still haven’t fully processed since 2010, for better and worse, what even counts as a “film” and how we see them have been altered forever. After a relatively wobbly start to the 21st century that now seems impossible, Disney have become a monster in the 2010s, consuming one of the great film studios in the last year in Fox, reshaping history as they see fit, flooding and fixing the market, threatening all the positives in the paragraphs above. 80% of the box office is simply too much for one studio to hold, and cinema as an art form is at risk if the 2020’s continue to allow expression to be supressed in the name of expansion.

You can see some of what’s at stake in some of the great Irish films that have come out this decade, both on screen and off. Wonderful work has been done with local cinema thanks to collaboration with fellow European studios, and great films that in decades past only Irish eyes would have been watching have warmly received worldwide. Check out our Best Irish Films of the Decade list, coming soon, for some of the best of our country’s cinema. More of that in the times ahead of us please, especially for this website’s sake. There are always challenges, but without the vibrant cinema scene that has continued to grow in this country, Film In Dublin would never have started. With that in mind, it’s a good time to delve into some of our writer’s personal favourites of the decade, our Best Movies of the 2010s.

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