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Directed by: James Gray Starring: Brad Pitt, Ruth Negga, Tommy Lee Jones, Donald Sutherland Runtime: 122 mins

Fresh off of Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Brad Pitt is leaping back into theatres dressed in a spacesuit and with a mellower demeanour than his previous role involved. Like Tarantino, director James Gray boasts a lean filmography, with only a handful of feature films to his name before Ad Astra

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The fifth event of its kind in Ireland, the Dublin Arabic Film Festival 2019 will take place at the Irish Film Institute and the Chester Beatty Library from the 4 – 6th of October. Sine the Omar Sharif visited the first edition of the festival in 2014, DAFF has presented some of the finest features that the Arab world has to offer to the fair city of film, and this year with festival director Zahara Moufid at the helm and Oscar nominated movie producer Jim Sheridan again serving as Festival President, it’s looking like a promising season of Arab cinema ahead.

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Director: Lorene Scafaria Starring: Jennifer Lopez, Constance Wu, Julia Stiles, Keke Palmer, Lili Reinhart Running Time: 110 minutes

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The strip club is a common port of call in the crime film, but it’s more typically shown as a treat for the men doing the crime. It’s a backdrop for partying during ‘the good times’, a sign of a movie crook’s dollar-raining hubris and sleaze. It’s shown as a place for men to flex their power, exude their control, revel in their success at playing the game. Be they mafia men or white-collar creeps, a movie may tut or titillate with them as they celebrate their ill-gotten gains surrounded by faceless, lifeless dancing girls. Based on the article The Hustlers at Scores by Jessica Pressler, Lorene Scafaria’s Hustlers shifts the focus to the strippers themselves, removing the male gaze and revealing the complex, insightful and engaging characters underneath, while showing up their marks as the “mostly rich, (usually) disgusting, (in their minds) pathetic men” in the process. In the cut-throat world of capitalism, it’s hustlers all the way up, or as Jennifer Lopez bluntly but perfectly puts it; “It’s all a strip club. You have people tossing the money and people doing the dance”.

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As culture in our fair city of film continues to recede, bulldozed aside by the careless and artless to stick up a few more hotels, it is more important than ever to encourage those who share art for art’s own sake. Those who genuinely embrace the wonderful, the wild and the weird of cinema, rather than simply Press Up against it….

Cabaret Noise introduced themselves during the summer with their efforts to  bring “cinemas greatest and most forgotten oddities” to  venues and locations around Dublin and they will be returning in the weeks and months ahead with their second series, THE HARVEST BLOOD MOON, a selection of horror films about seasonal change that are set to take place at The Darkroom this autumn and winter, with admissions free of charge (and donations welcome).

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For the last few years the Bleeding Pig Film Festival has a passion for bringing independent film to the local community. The main focus is on Irish short film, with the odd international twist thrown in also. Since starting on 2016, the Bleeding Pig Film Festival has showcased some of the best talent in the local Fingal area to, as well as more well known and award winning films, sharing a diverse, creative voice with the audience. Through Q&As and the intimacy provided by its traditional setting of Keeling’s in Donabate, it aims to bridge the gap between filmmaker and film fan in the fair city of film. Next month, the festival returns, with a prominent Irish feature added to the ranks of its shorts.

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In the latest episode of the Breakout Role Podcast, Luke and Jess watch 1983’s BMX Bandits, the first starring role of Nicole Kidman! #NicoleKidmanBreakout

Just 16 at the time this extended bicycle advert was made, Nicole vies for screentime against the stilted comedic stylings of the BMX Bandits, Goose and PJ. What is a powderpuff? Why do kids movies act like criminals are nothing to be afraid of? Was this extended bicycle advertisement a breakout or a fakeout for Nicole Kidman? Listen in and find out!

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Directed by: André Øvredal Starring: Zoe Colletti,Michael Garza, Gabriel Rush,Austin Zajur Runtime: 108 mins

With much of the summer’s horror focus on the highly anticipated It: Chapter 2, it was always going to take something special to divert the audiences’ attention from the second adaptation of Stephen King’s bestseller. Despite Guillermo del Toro’s involvement as producer, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark didn’t garner as much buzz as this summer’s other horror blockbusters enjoyed. It wouldn’t be fair to call this a debut from Norwegian director André Øvredal, with the mildly received but competently made The Autopsy of Jane Doe attached to his name in 2016. However, it is fair to say that this is the first time the director has been tested in a way that may definitively shape his future horror filmography.

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The short film In Orbit is dedicated to “the daoine who loved and those who couldn’t”. It’s a sci-fi story, or at least, a story rooted in a future looking back, that provides an insightful perspective on recent events in Ireland’s changing society and the impact that has on the people who live in it.In Orbit former optician Maura recounts her life story in an interview with the Head Archivist of the Human Experience Records, going over her memories as she meets Amy, a bright academic with broken glasses. For the first time in forty years, Maura wants to share her life. The only catch is leaving behind the world as she knows it.

Following on from In Orbit winning Best Irish Short at the GAZE LGBT Film Festival for 2019, Film In Dublin spoke to writer and director Katie McNeice about her process in making the film, its focus and more.

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The full programme for the 17th edition of the Irish Film Institute’s  Documentary Festival has been announced. With fifteen features, including 10 Irish premieres, and the always insightful and keenly awaited Irish shorts programme, the IFI Documentary Festival 2019 looks set to continue a great year of  Irish and international documentary being showcased in the fair city of film.

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As if the attractions at the GAZE LGBT Film Festival this or any year could be limited to a mere five standouts! Still, as one of the standout annual events in the fair city of film, both as a consistently excellent programme of cinema and as one the country’s biggest LGBT gatherings outside of Dublin Pride, GAZE generates considerable excitement every summer and it’s worth looking at why. The mood of film fans is buzzing nicely ahead of GAZE 2019’s Opening Gala taking place tonight, a sold-out screening at the Light House Cinema of the documentary Deep In Vogue. You can get an overview of this year’s programme here, but with so much to choose from in the five days of film ahead, we look at five reasons why you must get yourselves into the screens for GAZE 2019.

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