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The Fantastic Flix programme for the Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2019 is looking really fantastic – a diverse selection that celebrates films for young people from all over the world. Among the highlights of the programme announced so far is the attendance of director Joe Cornish for a screening of his latest film The Kid Who Would Be King, but a simple meet-and-greet isn’t all the director has in store when he arrives to Dublin for the 13th of February.

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The announcements are starting to roll in for the Virgin Media Dublin International Film Festival 2019 and frankly there might not be many more exciting that the news that comedy classic The Muppet Movie is going to be screening all over the fair city of film this February, as part of VMDIFF19’s Fantastic Flix programme.

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One of our most eagerly anticipated Irish releases this year, homegrown horror The Hole in the Ground has a new trailer out now that’s sure to leave your skin crawling, as Séana Kerslake surveys her son who’s come back from a mysterious hole out in the woods not quite right. The stylishly modern trailer combines some creepy imagery, old people smacking their heads off of windows, bodies flying, the ominous sight of the hole itself, set to a suitably scary version of the old classic of Irish infanticide, Weila Weila Walya. The film, premiering over at Sundance soon, will be out on Irish screens this spring. Check out the trailer after the jump.

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A very successful addition to the Dublin film festival calendar last year, the Dublin Smartphone Film Festival will be making a return later this month. Created by former Film In Dublin contributor a Robert Fitzhugh, showcases mobile storytellers. The festival’s mission is to encourage the next generation of filmmakers to share their stories and to provide them with a platform to present these stories to a wider audience and last year also featured several Film In Dublin writer’s among its judging panel. The programme for the festival is available now, and will include a wide selection of phone-made films from Ireland and abroad.

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A Quiet Place was a stunning debut from John Krasinski, showing that the horror genre has the scope to be emotionally-intelligent when handled properly. The film follows Lee Abbott (played by John Krasinski), Evelyn Abbott (Emily Blunt) and their children, who are struggling to navigate a world overrun by violent aliens who are attracted by any level of noise. The only way to stay safe is to stay silent. Not an easy feat with young children in tow.

For a film built around silence to have such masterful foley is truly impressive; the distinctive clicks the aliens emit send your skin crawling. In limiting shots of the aliens head-on and teasing with glimpses and low angles instead, Krasinski creates and maintains a strong sense of dread which carries the film during its less eventful moments.

But what earns A Quiet Place a space on the best of 2018 list is its successful suturing of the audience into the mindset of its characters. Our fear is borne from what’s at stake for them, not jump scares or gore. We’re on edge because Lee is scared for his little girl, who can’t hear and is therefore the most at risk of making noise. We’re on edge because Evelyn is pregnant and that baby is bound to cry when it’s born.

When a film becomes an award season juggernaut in the way that The Shape of Water did, racking up 87 wins from 243 nominations at a variety of ceremonies, the front-runner sweeping home on the way to Oscar wins that included Best Picture and Best Director, it’s becomes enveloped forever into that context, forever on a pedestal, conversations around it forever centered on which wins it did or didn’t deserve, if it being the most successful film from those who created it makes it the best one, and whether or not its that most useless word in film criticism, “overrated”. Discussing the merits of The Shape of Water is even more difficult than most examples of those discourse victims, as it’s not only the Homecoming King of 2017/2018 Awards Season, it’s also forever the Fish Fucking Movie.

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Mission: Impossible  – Fallout makes this list because the each act of the film on their own are better self-contained action stories than most blockbuster fare put out this year. A stunning triptych on the altar of Tom Cruise’s  self-destructive self-regard, Fallout is built on a thorough reeling through the list of pretty much every set-piece director Christopher McQuarrie can dream up and Cruise can delude himself into being dying (not yet literally) to do. Ethan Hunt dives through the Parisian sky as lightning cackles around him, decimates a bathroom with a totality and violence not usually seen outside of Stephen’s Day jacks-visits, rams trucks into rivers, races motorcycles around every square inch of one of Europe’s largest cities, chases after man mountain Henry Cavill (if he doesn’t crush you, no giant thing will) with a broken foot and with over 90 minutes of his latest mission already clocked, the man and his film haven’t even really gotten started yet. By the time Hunt starts playing Helicopter Conkers in the Himalayas, you’ll be literally floored as you realise you’ve gone way beyond the edge of your seat.

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You are cordially invited to spend this week (whatever blasted day it is) at the Light House Cinema, to have a ball watching the costumed have #drama in a mini season of costumed dramas. In anticipation of the release of Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Favourite, they’re bringing some of the all time great period piece powerhouses back to the big screen for a quick run. Though one should never run in such elegant gowns.Read more…

Director: Travis Knight Starring: Hailee Steinfeld, John Cena, Jorge Lendeborg Jr. Running Time: 114 minutes


For over a decade, the Michael Bay-inflicted Transformers movies have been a force for evil in the film world, a miserable exercise in corporate-asset churnery, a film series propelled by millions of dollars but decimal points of inspiration, a world-view that seemingly looked up to the US military and down on absolutely everyone else. First Shia Labeouf, and later Mark Wahlburg, the eejit ids of everything these films stand for (which is to say, nothing), ran and yelled and gawped through a swampy succession of increasingly convoluted and visually overwhelming CGI, and most any of the many watched it got nothing from it at all except for their hearts to be hardened, left for hours to stew in their own cynicism when faced with stupidity and sneers writ large in IMAX 3D; lazy mean-spiritedness blown up to overwhelming size. Merely not being that makes Bumblebee more than a breath of fresh air. It’s more a vital grasp of any air, wonderful oxygen gulped into screaming, scratched lungs that have been poisoned something noxious. On its own merits though, Bumblebee with its spirit, its optimism, and its creative enthusiasm, storms far, far ahead of everything else in the series so far, less a spin-off than a strike-out, a knock-out blow to its inferior predecessors, floating and stinging like, well you know.

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To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is wholesome teenage fantasy. It tells the story of Lara Jean (played by Lana Condor), a sweet and shy girl who develops crushes very easily but struggles to actually make connections with boys. This will be a bittersweet memory for many, and a fresh of breath air for current teenagers frustrated watching media feed them ideas of breezy confident teens engaging in casual sex (which is fine and real but not the reality for all). Watching this film is akin to curling up with a hot drink at a sleepover and finding out that you’re not as different as you thought.

The film doesn’t ridicule or sneer at its characters, unfortunately this is a rarity for media aimed at teenage girls! We recognise young girls as a lucrative demographic but boy do we hate em for it. Director Susan Johnson deftly explores LJ’s urge to make a connection and by the end we understand that losing her mother young has given Lara Jean a fear of loss so strong that she can’t let any of her crushes get close. There are visual separations and frames throughout the first half of the film to reflect the distance LJ fiercely maintains, this gradually breaks down and the colour palette moves from gentle pastels to sharp vibrant blues and reds when Lara Jean and Peter (Noah Centineo) finally kiss. It’s a well-constructed film which accounts for its mass popularity.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is a great example of American-Vietnamese representation. Because Lara Jean and her sisters just exist as American-Vietnamese people, it’s there but it’s not signposted constantly because it’s just part of who they are, an aspect of their experience – which is how whiteness and white characters relationship with race is always portrayed.